News /

Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten

Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers

Architects: a2o architecten
Location: Cellebroedersstraat, Hasselt,
Founder: Haumont nv
Contractor: Deholi nv , Centrum-Zuid 2607, 3530 Houthalen
Area: 2,000 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Niels Donkers

The building on the Cellebroedersstraat in Hasselt is ready for a new lease of life, having stood empty for a while. The former shop, with storage on the upper floors, is located in one of the streets between the ring road and the Grote Markt in Hasselt. The existing facade emphasises the anonymous character of the street and fails to connect with adjacent buildings.

Our new plan includes an upgrade of the facade in terms of building physics and better integration of the building in the street. The wooden cladding extends to the top of the building and works with the window openings to create a new composition. Occasionally, the window frames break through the wooden cladding, interrupting the rhythm of the wooden facade.

The floors have been divided into student accommodation units. The units are separated by light walls and respect the existing facade apertures. Each room has a removable unit containing a kitchen, shower, and toilet. The top of the unit provides a space to sleep. The lay-out of the rest of the room is left to the students. The ground floor space facing the street gets a new commercial function.

Our approach in this case was more like a performance in town. Over a period of three months, the building was stripped and given a new dress. The temporariness of the performance was underlined by the materials used: a wooden facade, light walls, et cetera. Whereas one would expect that this approach is only possible inside, this project shows that it can also intelligently be applied to the outer shell. The building and the structure allowed such an approach. Another advantage of this method is that the internal interventions could be reversed tomorrow, if necessary. This would enable the building to be converted into offices, for example.

Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten © Niels Donkers
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten Situation
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten Situation
Cellebroedersstraat / a2o architecten Sheme

Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect

Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink

Architects: Siebold Nijenhuis Architect
Location: , The Netherlands
Area: 110 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Menno Emmink

The Van Buchem House is originally designed by Jaap Bakema in 1962. Today it is a municipal monument. The villa is built in a U-shape with the south side left open. On the street side the facades have a closed character whereas the backside of the building has a more open and green character. Because of the minimal amount of doors, the internal structure is very open.

In 2007, the current owners of the villa asked for the addition of extra space as in the original design was not enough room for the needs of the young family. Their desire was to create a library to store the families book collection. At the same time, this room should also be used as a study or guestroom. In order to create the extra space, it was chosen to solve the expansion underground at the location of the patio. By doing this, the original volume and composition of the building will remain intact. Next to the library, also an additional bathroom and games room is created. The spaces below ground level will bathe in the sunlight from above by the multiple glass rooflights which are carefully integrated in the garden design as well.

The floor inside the patio is newly set up and features the same stone as was used in the original design for the floor of the living room and outdoor terraces. This enhances the effect that the interior gradually fades into the garden. The stones are imported from an Italian quarry.

The house itself has been renovated and restored by its original principles. The brick walls have been cleaned and all the woodwork outside is repainted. Also some window frames have been renewed. The damaged floor in the living room is removed and replaced by a newly laid floor which also contains a new heating system. Finally all walls inside are plastered again and all the facilities of the house have been updated, including a new underground thermal storage system.

Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect © Menno Emmink
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect Ground Floor Plan
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect Basement Floor Plan
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect Section
Van Buchem House / Siebold Nijenhuis Architect Section

Mayor of London Suggests Three Potential Sites for Major Airport

Mayor of London Suggests Three Potential Sites for Major Airport Foster + Partners' Proposal for Thames Hub

Identifying connectivity as the key to prosperity within the 21st century, Mayor Boris Johnson acknowledged the wider economic and regeneration potential of a new hub airport at a City Hall meeting today.

In his speech, Johnson recommended three optimal locations for the new airport: the Isle of Grain in north Kent; Stansted; or on an artificial island in the middle of the Thames estuary. These three suggestions come as a result of a year-long, independently peer-reviewed investigation by the Transport for London, which confirmed the inability of London’s current major airport, Heathrow, to meet demands due to space restrictions.

More on London’s future hub airport after the break…

Daniel Moylan, the Mayor of London’s chief adviser on aviation, explained: “Heathrow can never solve our problems. [...] The immense noise, pollution and congestion that would result from expanding an airport located in the heart of our suburbs would potentially devastate the greatest city in the world. Whereas the three potential sites for a new hub airport portray a compelling vision for the infrastructure, the economy and the international competitiveness that London and the wider UK could benefit from if we take the clear opportunities that are in front of us.”

“A new airport,” he continued, “would be accompanied by world-class public transport connectivity, it would have the resilience to withstand the worst the UK’s weather has to offer; and it would have the capacity to save you from being stranded in a never ending spiral of aircraft over the suburbs.”

Over the past few years, numerous proposals have been suggested, including Norman Foster’s Thames Estuary Airport and Beckett Rankine’s offshore proposal.

The Mayor is expected to submit detailed proposals for all three sites to the Davies Commission later in the week.

To read the press release issued by the Mayor of London earlier today in full, follow this link

Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects

Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela

Architects: Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Architect In Charge: Mauricio Pezo, Sofia von Ellrichshausen
Collaborators: Joao Quintela, Tim Simon, Peter Weeber
Builder: Kairos
Structural Consultant: Luis Mendieta
Area: 100.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Diana Quintela

From the architect. This somehow modest yet monumental piece appears as a simple form of opposition – that substantial role of Architecture – but in a temporal and non-conclusive manner. It is a duplicated archetypical figure of two columns supporting a beam that are articulated perpendicular to each other so as to define a cross shaped plan. The dimension in section, height and span is meant to unveil the hidden asymmetry of the existing pavilion.

By a manifested displacement of the very gravitational point of the whole interior (literally materialized by a pending granite bolder that is suspended on top of the water mirror), the gap between column and wall defines a new and specific character for the east-west diagonal flanks. There are only three dimensions for the pine lumber: one for the structural frames, another one for the cladding and the third one to join the other two.

Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects © Diana Quintela
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Plan
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Site Plan
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Model
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Model
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Axon
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Detail
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Structure
Crux Pavilion / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects Sketch

ArchDaily Interns Needed for Fall 2013

post (1) post (1)

 

ArchDaily is looking for some awesome, architecture-obsessed Interns to join our team for Fall 2013 (August 19th – December 6th)! If you want to research/write about the best architecture around the globe – and find out what it takes to work for the world’s most visited architecture website – then read on after the break…

  • Applicants must be native English-Speakers.
  • Applicants must have completed their first year of University.
  • Applicants must be able to work from home (or school, workplace) and occasionally attend events.
  • Applicants must be able to dedicate 15 hours per week: the schedule is flexible, but you must be reachable Monday through Friday.
  • Writing experience is a huge plus (have a Blog, write for your school paper?), tell us about it on the form below.
  • Basic experience with WordPress, Facebook, Twitter, Photoshop or video editing are a plus. Please indicate this in the form below.

If you think you have what it takes, please fill out the following form by August 5th, 9:00 AM EST. We will contact potential candidates (and only potential candidates) for follow-ups the week of August 5th – 9th.

  1. (required)
  2. (valid email required)
  3. (required)
  4. (required)
  5. (required)

  6. Yes
    No
    (required)
  7. (required)
  8. (required)
  9. (required)
  10. (required)
 

cforms contact form by delicious:days

Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult

Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner

Architects: ArchitekturConsult
Location: Werfenweng, Austria
Project Manager: Herwig Zöhrer and Manfred Schuster
Design Team: Diethard Susnik, Hans Kaponig, Sue Weigelt, Ingrid Brigant, Annemarie Scheidl, Martina Kletzenbauer, Eva Gugerbauer, Alexandra Nahrgang
Area: 6,185 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Helmut Lackner

Construction Manager: Spiluttini Bau
Interiors: Lorenzo Bellini
Landscape: Land in Sicht

The location of the property is majestic: In the south it borders the heart of the village, where the cemetery, local government office, fire brigade, music and community hall, public school and pre-school facility are located. On the western side, there is Wengeraustraße with its farm shop and where the ski bus stops. The road curves toward the north-eastern boundary of the property where also the cross-country ski route runs past. One accommodation wing is supported by six powerful reinforced concrete columns and projects around 23 meters over the rock garden at the entrance driveway of the hotel. This allows sporting enthusiasts to ski right up to the mountrain resort in true style.

The hotel complex consists of a low, massive basement with white plastering which opens itself to the mountain pa- norama with a curved glass façade and three attached accommodation wings with 120 rooms of different categories. These three building sections have slightly sloping monopitch roofs, are clad with larch , 19 metres wide and bet- ween 40 and 50 metres long. Each wing is oriented toward a different direction. This provides the loggias in front of the rooms with different views. The minimum layout consists of a bathroom, separate toilette, a seating section, a comfor- table bed and a glass sliding door on the loggia where two armchairs and a table are provided for guests. To ensure that the mountains can still be seen from the sun lounger, the railings have been kept low.

Three residences with apartments that are connected to the hotel via bridges complete the accommodation offered. With a flat saddle roof and larch wood cladding they are of the same type as the hotel wings; however, with their height of three storeys, a width of 13 metres and a length of around twenty to a maximum of 28 metres, they are considerably smaller. In this way, they take on the dimensions of the surrounding buildings and form the transition to the village, which borders the area in the west and south.

Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult © Helmut Lackner
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Site Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Plan
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Section
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Section
Hotel Bergresort Werfenweng / ArchitekturConsult Diagram

Zaha Hadid Unveils New York Apartment Block Alongside High Line

Zaha Hadid Unveils New York Apartment Block Alongside High Line Courtesy of Related Companies

Zaha Hadid has unveiled her first commission: an 11-story, luxury apartment block planned alongside the second section of the High Line in Chelsea at 520 West 28th Street.

Spearheaded by New York developer Related Companies, the “sculpted” glass and steel residential development hopes to lure buyers with its expansive, double-height entrance lobby, communal garden, generous terraces, private courtyards, and, of course, exclusive views of New York’s most beloved attraction: the High Line.

“Our design is an integration of volumes that flow into each other and, following a coherent formal language, create the sensibility of the building’s overall ensemble,” explained Hadid. “With an arrangement that reinvents the spatial experience, each residence will have its own distinctive identity, offering multiple perspectives and exciting views of the neighborhood.”

The mid-rise development will feature approximately 37 residences of up to 5,500 square feet, focusing on gracious layouts with 11-foot ceilings, thoughtful technological integration and state-of-the-art finishes and features. Designed with multiple elevator cores, a majority of the residences will have a private vestibule and entrance that adds to the intimacy of the building.

Reference: Related CompaniesDezeen 

Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid

Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae

Architects: Karim Rashid
Location: Seoul, South Korea
Design Team: Juliette Hyunju Lee, Alex Loyer Hughes, Kamala Hutauruk, Mike Gibson, Mana Mohammadkhani
General Contactor: Kingsmen Korea
Area: 900 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Lee Gyeon Bae

From the architect.

Kapitol plays on the idea of the spacial, visual landmark as a gathering place. It creates a recognizable, iconic location in the space for people to gather, meet, socialize and eat in color! The organic “islands” not only infuse the space with character and contemporary aesthetic, they serve as a pivotal landmark around each column, where people meet and gather. The freeform ceiling opens the visual plane outwards and above and provide concealed local lighting and  for eating.

The islands are centrifugal in arrangement, inviting users to interact, communicate and socialize in the space. This creates a lively dynamic setting which generates a sense of place for gathering and will ultimately make the space successful. The undulating perimeter of the area is perforated to create visual openings for service counters. Snack locations are “carved” into the surrounding perimeter creating with strong visual highlights for the eye inside. The floor plays off the linear patterns of the perimeter wall creating a strong wireframe that creates a sense of continuous dynamism and motion within the space.A strong dynamic presentation wall serves as a backdrop to the space creating a visual focal point while concealing vertical circulation from the communal space.

A soft and minimal organic cash counter will attract attention to the product on display and not the financial transaction behind. These dropped in “blobs” add character and color to the space. Not only are they strategically placed to capture and distribute intelligent circulation flow of the customer, but they also offer a recognizable landmark location within the space that makes purchasing and selecting easy for everyone.

As Gianfranco Zaccai once said, “Design has primarily focused on the visual and the tactile, but we are now.” The kinesthetic, the sensorium, the omniexperiential: the future will be made up of an orgy of experiences. The digital age has created a new hypersensitivity, a more exotic connection with our senses, and a kaleidoscope of stimuli, of information, of living, loving, and well-being. Design will always find new languages and mark our time on the planet and these ‘Techorganic’ works here speaks about this moment in which we live, and speaks about a new movement that will shape humanity.

I prefer a certain amorphous softness, soothing human forms, using new technologies, which I call technorganic objects. Don’t’ forget we take design too seriously sometimes. Design development is serious but the consumer should sense a playfulness to elevate their lives, to make them happier. Humor is the underlying most important part of our human condition – I think everything should be smart and beautiful and holistically designed – meaning it is experimental and ecological, but in everything I inject some human spirit of humor – because it lightens up this overtly-serous thing we call LIFE.

The true spirit of the Technorganic world is where organics meets technology and Orgonomics – where commerce, organics, and ergonomics all converge to shape an industrial world that is sensual, beautiful, poetic, voluminous, and so human. Flowing semantic beauty that touches and inspires my life.

Kapitol – Technorganic “K”apitolizes on these concepts and introduces strong grain patterns along the perimeter wall. Flooring patterns are two toned with subtle variation. Tables and seating are accented to highlight color in the space. Lime, Orange, Pink and Blue come together with Grain to form the Technorganic Palette.

Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid © Lee Gyeon Bae
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid Floor Plan
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid Section
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid Section
Lotte Amoje, Food Capital / Karim Rashid Section

Mies’ IBM Building Gets Lavish Refurbishment

Mies' IBM Building Gets Lavish Refurbishment © Jeffery Howe

Mies van der Rohe’s last constructed skyscraper, the IBM building in Chicago, recently underwent a significant transformation: the modernist office building is now a 316-room luxury hotel. An interesting post on the ArchitectureChicago Plus blog weighs in on the building’s history and ponders: will Mies’ minimalist aesthetic be compromised by its new lavish furnishings? Read it all here.

Ascó Visitor Center / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip

Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute

Architects: Josep Camps + Olga Felip
Location: Ascó, Cataluña, Spain
Photographs: Pedro Pegenaute

Collaborators: M. Agudo, A. Horta, I. Solà, J. Farrés, A. Serrats
Technical Architect: PROINTEC
Building Services: PROINTEC
Structures: GMKgrup
Construction: TCSA

In this place, desolate territory, industry and landscape are not related, they are simply juxtaposed. They coexist without tension here, in this place, the boundary condition is felt uncomfortable. There is no shelter, no support between the Ebro river and the topography between the plant and the city.

The need to anchor to this place is strong, and we started to dust the grid on a blank paper, a 42 x 42 abstract square with an unreferenced perimeter. On the square, an orthogonal grid with an interval of rows A A B A A and columns a b a a b a. On the grid, B divides the square into two. Between reception space and exhibition space, B articulates, B is circulation and transition space.

On the grid, a b a a b a modulate and organize programmatic conditions of reception and framing.

In between, we show the exhibition content of the grid. In this place it loses purity, and now exudes a sense of belonging. Abstraction and specificity are intertwined, XY are no longer axes but coordinates, two structural directions: east-west, landscape, the Ebro river and the topography, north-south, artifice, industry, and Ascó.

Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Unknown photographer
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip © Pedro Pegenaute
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip Plan
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip Section
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip Diagram
Centro de Visitantes Ascó / [ARQUITECTURIA] Josep Camps + Olga Felip Diagram

Light Matters: Can Light “Cheat” In Simulations?

Light Matters: Can Light "Cheat" In Simulations? Oslo Central Station. Architecture: Space Group, www.spacegroup.no. Credit: Luxigon, www.luxigon.com.

In recent years the use of CAD and simulation programs has resulted in a new understanding of light in architecture. The drawing board and its lamp have given way to the self-illuminating monitor. The result is that concepts in architecture are now made of light from the very first mouse click.  In the visualisation process, luminous space now predominates.

However, this begs the question: has the luminous impression (part and parcel of the perfect, rendered setting) become more important than the engineering or architectural concept itself? With the improved interplay of shades, contrast, and brilliance, can actually obscure the point of a realistic simulation?

More Light Matters, after the break…

While shades of sunlight can be illustrated in sketches with relative ease, imagining the interaction of multiple light sources in a space quickly becomes difficult. Thus, before the new millennium, architectural plans used to be displayed without indirect light due to a lack of hardware resources.

However, modern rendering engines can now clearly display daylight as well as incorporate indirect illumination interacting with surfaces, generating images with photographic realism. Furthermore, virtual luminaires (lighting fixtures) with photometric data offer the option to calculate illumination with physical accuracy, which allows for precise quantitative analysis in addition to aesthetic decisions. But even with the most sophisticated rendering engines, the qualitative results have their limits.

Although the more recent High Dynamic Range (32-bit/HDR) format offers a greater scope of contrast than previous processes with 8-bit and 255 gradations and theoretically covers the full luminance range of Nature (in which the sun is 10,0000 times brighter than a shaded zone), the perception of a perfect HDR rendering in print or on screen still does not fully compare to the atmospheric impression of a real, bright space, because image media currently cannot transmit factors such as glare or adaptation.

Thus, the advent of digital media has not only increased the speed of image production but has also given rise to new, though initially unconsidered, understandings of and ways of using light – as dictated by the characteristics (and limitations) of hardware and software. In particular, two distinct approaches towards visualization have emerged: on the one hand, scientific engineers who are mainly interested in quantitative data analysis in order to ensure a technically correct construction; on the other, Visionary Designers, who seek a subtle or impressive atmosphere with light. They develop a quality of light without any technical restrictions and ”cheat” with details in order to convincingly communicate an idea to a client. Even if this approach is less committed to reality, it can nevertheless stimulate the imagination and become a valuable tool in innovative designs.

For Jeremy Birn, a lighting technical director at Pixar Animation Studios, “cheating” with light occurs on a daily basis: “Cheating is performed, to some extent, on almost every project done in 3D. … Light on a character that appears to come from a lamp may actually come from a position far away from the lamp if it lights a character better.” For Jeremy, lighting and cinematography are arts and not sciences. No matter the lighting style, it only matters that the light be believable to the viewer.  Thus, the most important requirement is that the image be internally consistent, e.g. showing a beam of direct sunlight brighter than the light of a task light or forming a shadow correctly.

Of course, the challenge for architecture starts when a client is keen on the imaginative visualisation and then asks the architect to make the concept a reality.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

However, even still, perhaps the “cheat” is better than the alternative. For example, video visualizations have become more and more relevant in architecture, and yet the technology often wields unsatisfying results, as rendered films with a high degree of realism (in terms of indirect light and reflection) are difficult to produce; the spatial dynamics for precise lighting simulations require considerable computer power.

In the case of the Graz Art Museum by realities:united, an abstract project which utilizes a complex video mapping technique on the facade, the visualization was severely limited to a flat treatment of the pixel façade that excluded indirect lighting and reflections. The GreenPIX simulator by Simone Giostra & Partners and ARUP similarly reduced realistic lighting details for the benefit of a faster rendering process. The NIX project study by realities:united, on the other hand, although not particularly naturalistic in all lighting details, at least allowed a dynamic impression and different perspectives that vividly demonstrated the interaction between the interior lighting and the effect on the urban environment.

And so, perhaps “cheating” is a preferable alternative, one that more accurately conveys the intent of the project, rather than letting the project fall flat. What is your opinion? Is it OK if you cheat with the lighting in architectural renderings? Do lighting simulations need to be accurate from the early concept up to working drawings? Or is some artistic and atmospheric leeway preferred? Please share your view in the comments below.

For further reading:

- Birn, Jeremy: Lighting & Rendering. New Riders, Berkeley. 2006.

- Ochoa, C.E., Aries, M.B.C. & Hensen, J.L.M.: State of the art in lighting simulation for building science: a literature review. Journal of Building Performance Simulation, 5(4), Pp. 209–233. 2012.

- Groß, Axel: Animation and digital lighting. PLD 2nd Global Lighting Design Convention, Berlin. 2010.

, a monthly column on light and space, is written by Thomas Schielke. Based in Germany, he is fascinated by architectural lighting, has published numerous articles and co-authored the book „Light Perspectives“. For more information check www.arclighting.de or follow him @arcspaces

Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio

Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan

Architects:
Location: Seoul, South Korea
Architect In Charge: Kim Jae-Kwan
Construction: Kim Jae-Kwan. Lee GI-Joo, Kim Tae-Hwan
Area: 127 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Kim Jae-Kwan, Courtesy of Moohoi Architecture

If you live in a place where your children feel safe on their way home thanks to soldiers and policemen standing guard your home around the clock and all the year round; thus a thief dare not show up; you are gently reminded up even when your car is scratched by somebody; but if you suspect that they can watch not only your children’s safety, thefts, and vandals but also, maybe… maybe your garden and even your living room through high resolution binoculars as if they are spying on neighboring movements but actually your home.

If you live in a town where your neighbor’s fence infringes on your land and another neighbor infringes on alley, and even you infringe their land…; you may get relieved because it is conventional in old town but reviewing Building Act reveals that you have to give up 10㎡ to satisfy the minimum condition of alley width to four meters, and building coverage ratio and floor area ratio don’t signify nothing in your land due to the right of light to north, setback regulation on the fa?ade, and height limit from Cultural Heritage Protection Act; you just decided to move main gate of your house from the roadside to alley, but your neighbor notices it and comes to you saying “Umm, as you know, I regard this alley as my garden. I am going to grow Chinese cabbage and lettuce for preparing kimchi for the winter. So I oppose to your plan to open your main gate on this side” and the term ‘opposition’ implies that he may file a civil complaint if you don’t respect his opinion.

If you live in a place near a military base free from prying eyes due to its limited accessibility but one day castle of Bukhan mountain is opened to the public and they freely peep your garden and terrace on their way to the castle,

If you live in an ill-fated place Vassili Zaitsev prefers to lurk waiting to attack with Mosin Nagant, a commander may use for firing range and Zhao Yun[1] may call contemporary Changban[2]; a group of motorcycle gangs pass by with their hands on (not grapping) the handlebar of Harley-Davison, as if they are aligning with others, wearing chaps (even in summer), sunglasses (even in  rainy day) and helmet making a thundering noise every weekends and holidays; at noon, tourists hang around your gate asking “Were izu ?tonn?… Sanmotoonge Caf? on Televi?”[3]; in the late fternoon, a long line of  camouflaged soldiers armed to the teeth trek peeping in your garden.

If you live in a place new bride moved to your neighbor is always complaining of looking down on her garden mentioning invasion of privacy, in spite of your explanation about the steep site condition which makes you look down her garden as your neighbor on the other side does yours as usual in old town but she argues that she can’t understand because she has lived in apartment houses, though your former neighbor said hello and share food though each garden is open to each other.

If you live in a house facing South considered good for living but with good space only on southern side (usually bedrooms, front entrance, and living room) and dark and stuffy space on the other side (usually kitchen, bathroom, and boiler room); turning on the boiler raises not indoor temperature but only hitting bills; masonry wall and footing wall delivering the weight of roof to the ground exceed their role and suck up underground water like sponge.

Then you have to make to JIPSOORI your home. Like this.

Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio Courtesy of Moohoi Architecture
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio Courtesy of Moohoi Architecture
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio Courtesy of Moohoi Architecture
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio Courtesy of Moohoi Architecture
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio © Kim Jae-Kwan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio First Floor Plan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio Roof Floor Plan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio Site Plan
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio Detail
Yujin’s Jip-Soori / Moohoi Architecture Studio Courtesy of Moohoi Architecture

Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio

Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman

Architects: Cooper Joseph Studio
Location: Geyserville, CA, USA
Architect In Charge: Wendy Evans Joseph, Chris Cooper
Design Team: Chris Good, Read Langworthy
Area: 2849.0 sqm
Year: 2010
Photographs: Elliott Kaufman, Courtesy of Cooper Joseph Studio

Associate Architect: Richardson Architects
Structural Engineers: Tysinger & Associates Structural Engineers
Landscaping: Jacobsen Landscaping
General Contractor: RedHorse Constructors

From the architect. This agricultural property in Sonoma, California is the home of two scientists who are involved in various farm projects including the production of olives, olive oil, honey, as well as bee keeping, extensive gardening and other endeavors that take advantage of the area’s climate, soils and siting. And as part of the “locavore” movement, they bring their produce to local markets and restaurants.

The Owners requested an efficient renovation that would maximize hillside views and connect the two levels to allow for a more open living experience. They also requested that be a dominant material.

The house is 2,200 square feet on two levels. The main exposure faces north, taking advantage of the view, breezes and indirect light. The existing north façade, stair and porch were removed and replaced with a new glass wall and balcony structure. We maintained most of the original wood framing for the house itself including board and baton siding (stained dark grey) and a gable roof structure. Inside, the upstairs living room was removed, opening the lower level den to the full height of the volume. Instead of having a dark living room on each of the two levels, they now have one exciting living space with open views and light.

The balcony is the iconic form that redefines the image and focus of the house. Ipe is used as a screen and framing device. This material brings warmth to the cool California light, creating a more intimate setting and focusing views on the surrounding landscape. Ipe was chosen specifically for its strength and ability to span the entire depth of the porch without intermediate support. It will weather naturally over time, resulting in a more artistic patina against the dark background.

Inside, oak is the primary material of choice. A consistent cut-size and grain direction was used for all floors, kitchen cabinetry, wall panels, stairs, and railings. The countertop is a butcher block.

Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio © Elliott Kaufman
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio Before
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio Second Floor Plan
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio Site Plan
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio Section
Sonoma Residence / Cooper Joseph Studio First Floor Plan

RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design

RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii

Architects: Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design
Location: Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan
Year: 2012
Photographs: Koji Fujii

This is a dwelling in Shizuoka Prefecture. The site has a 4-meter wide road to its east and is in an area blessed with nature and old rice fields. It is spaciously elongated from east to west. Our layout plan was launched by planting a plum tree on the west of the site.

The house is designed with the second floor as the main “living space”. The first floor is comprised of bedrooms and other private areas, while the second floor is visually one large open room, serving as a living and dining space for the family to get together. By arranging three skip-floors and an inner courtyard surrounded by glass walls, we created natural zoning between the living, dining and kitchen areas. This enables the family to feel each other’s presence while allowing the freedom for individuals to pursue their own activities. The inner courtyard gives a gentle partitioning to the house.

The arrangement of the windows allows effective ventilation and to produce comfortable living conditions. They also serve to create visual rhythm. We especially valued the expressions of light from both inside and outside the house. “Daylight flowing in from outside” and “interior spilling out into the night” each fulfills their respective roles.

The natural light coming into the rooms offers inhabitants a healthy and comfortable life. At night, interior lighting adds colors to the unwinding time within while giving an atmospheric expression to the outside. This consideration of “efficacy of natural outdoor light and interior lighting” was an important factor to this house.

Another feature of the house is the wide open area to its west. We can observe the relocated plum tree from here. A plum tree has a long life-span, is a representational spring-flowering tree of Japan, and is rich in expression from its fall colors to defoliation in winter. Along with the family of this house, it will weave through the cycle of atmospheric seasons over the course of time.

RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design © Koji Fujii
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design Elevation
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design Elevation
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design Plan
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design Plan
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design Section
RHYTHM and Plum Tree / Keisuke Kawaguchi + K2-Design Section

Economic & Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena

Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas

Architects: Juan M. Otxotorena
Location: Pamplona, Navarre,
Collaborators Architects: Gloria Herrera, Catalina Delgado, Jorge Ortega
Area: 15,529.6 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Jose Manuel Cutillas, Ruben Perez Bescos, Pedro Pegenaute

Project Quantity Surveyors: Isabelino Río, Ignacio Quintana
Construction Quantity Surveyors: Gorka Visiers, Ignacio Quintana, Óscar Lacruz
Structure Engineering: José Ignacio Etayo, arquitecto
Facilities Engineering: AM & asociados, NAVEN Ingenieros, ALS/ architectural lighting solutions

The new building is the definite headquarters of the Faculty of Economy and Business; it has a large provision of classrooms and rooms available for the increase in the teaching possibilities of the University, adapted to its evolution. It is located in the Pamplona campus and it is next to the current Law building, with which it is connected by means of different accesses in the East and South façades.

The close relationship between both is contemplated. Their offers are complemented and they will share students and spaces. In short, the maximum interconnection between both buildings is attempted, which will have a single access from the outside. The new construction appears from the beginning, marked by the new role acquired by the Postgraduate courses (Masters and Doctorate programmes).

From the point of view of the shape of the building, we can highlight the desire to respect as much as possible the well-looked after green campus which currently goes down to the river before this building and which it is part, with a special degree of protagonism, of the visual and environmental heritage of the campus.

The construction is attached to the Law building, as mentioned, with a similar size and loyal to its essential alignments and the addition of a new common façade. This is justified by the solution offered for access, and acquires outstanding importance in the result given its exceptional length, and as it it’s the one providing the background to the mentioned green campus. It is designed as a façade with a serried structure and rhythmic expression, coherent with its scale. It is made up by a system of vertical concrete elements able to act as a filtering device of space and views, as a parasol for the sections of the elevation framed by their vocation of opening and transparency.

The other façades of the building are completely open to the exterior, with a continuous glass outside wall. This presents, however, a paused visual expression by the active presence of vertical elements in its structure: it is projected to the exterior in order to ensure its protection against the sun and improve the geometrical cleaning of the spaces. The last decision was also taken in view of an indication received in said respect from the entity, wishing to become as flexible as possible and prevent interferences in the event of possible future changes in the distribution of the floors.

The option for the starring role of the faced concrete, which is extended to the rest of the building, is justified by obvious reasons of consistency, stability and solidity, and links with that of the neighbouring buildings. The external image of the building, based on faced concrete and glass is supplemented by the use of metal, opaque or more or less permeable cladding—depending on the case—, in whose design technical precision is sought, as well as expressive contrast and visual quality.

The inside layout of the building is based on elementary geometry that privileges the serration and regular repetition of elements and alignments of rooms and constructive elements. It revolved around the creation of a central covered patio called to take the pulse of its distribution and spaciousness. Everything revolves around the same: activity, space and traffic.

The project is distributed in its largest part in the ground and first floor, which are extended in the surface occupied; these storeys spatially connect as they are perforated with the large central patio, which crosses the same until it reaches the roof in search for natural light by means of skylights. The ground floor, which is the one used for access is the highest in certain points. The main volume is crowned with a lineal development of offices for the professors on the top floor, one the roof. The volume is completed with a series of back-to-back bodies amongst which we could highlight those corresponding to the deacon, chapel and ‘tower’ of offices. The later completes the provision of offices already existing on the top floor, reaching the required number, without overloading or forcing the occupation of the building on the floor plan.

Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Ruben Perez Bescos
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Pedro Pegenaute
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Ruben Perez Bescos
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Jose Manuel Cutillas
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Ruben Perez Bescos
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Ruben Perez Bescos
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Ruben Perez Bescos
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena © Ruben Perez Bescos
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Plan
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Plan
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Plan
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Site Plan
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Location
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Elevation
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Elevation
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Elevation
Economic&Masters Building UNAV / Juan M. Otxotorena Detail

TED: Why We Should Build Wooden Skyscrapers / Michael Green

TED: Why We Should Build Wooden Skyscrapers / Michael Green TED: Why We Should Build Wooden Skyscrapers / Michael Green

Click here to view the embedded video.

Building a skyscraper? Forget about steel and concrete, architect Michael Green says build it out of . As he details in this intriguing talk, it’s not only possible to build safe wooden structures up to 30 stories tall (and, he hopes, higher), it’s necessary.

Read more about Green’s ‘Case for Tall Buildings’ here and share your comments below.

James Lloyd is remembered in an exhibition at the Austin Desmond Gallery in London

This month at the Austin Desmond Gallery, James Lloyd, who has not had a solo exhibition since 1977, will be remembered.

    

Rembrandt showed us what it feels like to be inside the human skin

As Rembrandt is celebrated in a Google Doodle, Mark Hudson pays tribute to this extraordinary artist.

    

British art week flourishes with sales of £47 million

British art week has exceeded expectations with sales of £47 million, including Edward Burne-Jones’s Love Among the Ruins.

    

Rembrandt anniversary celebrated with Google Doodle

Google Doodle celebrates anniversary of birth of Rembrandt with 1659 painting Self Portrait with Beret and Turned-Up Collar.

    

Colby College Museum of Art opens new 26,000-square-foot Alfond-Lunder Family Pavilion

With the opening of the Alfond-Lunder Family Pavilion this weekend, the Colby College Museum of Art—long recognized for its substantial and important American art collection—now has the most exhibition space of any art museum in Maine and has confirmed its status as one of the nation’s premier institutions of American art. Seven inaugural exhibitions demonstrate the strength and breadth of the museum’s collection and offer new perspectives on the renowned Lunder Collection, one of the most important private collections of American art ever assembled, which was recently gifted to the museum. Designed by the distinguished Los Angeles-based firm Frederick Fisher and Partners Architects, the 26,000-square-foot pavilion creates a light-filled gateway to the existing museum and serve as a beacon for Maine residents and visitors, while providing an additional

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, celebrates a revolution in fashion with styles influenced by Hippies

Paisley, beads, and fringe will adorn the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston this summer, as the influence of hippie culture in the late 1960s and early ‘70s is celebrated with offerings ranging from groovy fashions to psychedelic music to a trippy online interactive. Taking visitors back in time to 1967 through 1972, Hippie Chic will showcase the colorful and fun spirit of “hippie” style that informed the beautifully made garments of “chic,” in 54 ensembles, including new acquisitions and loans from other museums and private collections. On view from July 16 to November 11, 2013, the exhibition will offer an immersive experience with shag rugs, spinning lights, and themed wallpaper throughout the gallery. Mannequins, (some atop turning platforms) are styled in fashions of the era, complete with far-out hair. Taking center stage will

Reinventing Abstraction curated by Raphael Rubinstein on view at Cheim & Read

This exhibition focuses on New York abstraction in the 1980s as practiced by a generation of painters born between 1939 and 1949. Official accounts of the 1980s—the decade when most of these artists either emerged or solidified their approaches—tend to ignore the individualistic abstraction exemplified by these painters in favor of more easily identifiable movements and styles (Neo-Expressionism, Appropriation Art, Neo-Geo etc). For these artists, who were in their 30s and 40s during the 1980s, it was not a question of a “return to painting,” but, rather, of finding a bridge between the radical, deconstructive abstraction of the late 1960s and 1970s (which many of them had been marked by) with a larger painting history and more subjective approaches. They opened their work to elements that had been largely

The first exhibition to focus on fashion in the works of the Impressionists opens in Chicago

The groundbreaking and critically acclaimed exhibition Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity, which opened in Paris in October 2012, landed at the Art Institute this summer as the final stop on its world tour. Organized by the Art Institute of Chicago, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, the exhibition broke attendance records in Paris and has been lauded by international and national critics alike. Roberta Smith of the New York Times called the New York presentation a “thrilling, erudite show” with “visual fireworks, historical clarity, and pitch-perfect contextualizing.” Vogue proclaimed the show “breathtaking” for its portrayal of “art’s passionate love affair with fashion in the boulevards and salons of late 19th-century France.” And now audiences in Chicago are able to spend the summer with the first exhibition to explore the role

Party Wall: MoMA PS1 shows winner of the 2013 Young Architects Program in Long Island City

The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 announce the opening of Party Wall, the CODA (Caroline O’Donnell, Ithaca, NY) –designed winner of the annual Young Architects Program (YAP) in New York. Now in its 14th edition, the Young Architects Program at MoMA and MoMA PS1 is committed to offering emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop creative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation at MoMA PS1 that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling. CODA, drawn from among five finalists, designed a temporary urban landscape for the 2013 Warm Up summer music series in MoMA PS1’s outdoor courtyard. Party Wall is a pavilion and flexible experimental space that uses its large-scale, linear form to provide shade for the Warm

Whitney and Aldrich museums collaborate to present photography exhibition

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum has been chosen as one of six nationwide sites to exhibit work donated to the Whitney Museum of American Art by eminent philanthropist Emily Fisher Landau. The exhibition is on view in Ridgefield, CT, from June 8 through September 2, 2013. The Aldrich is the only venue to focus on significant photographs by influential artists from the collection: Richard Artschwager, Matthew Barney, Keith Cottingham, Lynn Davis, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, John Dugdale, Nan Goldin, Rodney Graham, Robert Longo, Vera Lutter, Robert Mapplethorpe, Abelardo Morell, Shirin Neshat, Victoria Sambunaris, Lorna Simpson, Kiki Smith, and Hiroshi Sugimoto. This focused exhibition is an iteration of the Whitney

Decadence: Aspects of Austrian Symbolism on view at the Lower Belvedere

This is the first time that the Belvedere highlights the multifaceted positions of Austrian Symbolism in a major exhibition. As a first step towards a long-overdue review of this highly significant movement in Austrian art around 1900, which has hitherto almost exclusively been analyzed from partial aspects, the show offers an overview of the development of the Symbolist approach in Austria and Central Europe. Presenting a diversified compilation of artistic viewpoints on a number of themes, Decadence – Aspects of Austrian Symbolism illustrates a large spectrum of styles and personal ways of expression. An artistic intervention by the Canadian composer and installation artist Robin Minard expands the visual and acoustic experience of the exhibition, so that the show also takes into account the interdisciplinary aspirations of this art movement. “Although it provided the basis for relevant movements of the twentieth century, such

Bellevue Arts Museum honors local ceramist Patti Warashina with exhibition

Patti Warashina, the pioneering Pacific Northwest ceramic artist whose insight and intellect have served as the cornerstones of a career spanning over five decades, is being honored at Bellevue Arts Museum for her contributions to the world of ceramics with a retrospective exhibition on view through October 27, 2013. Patti Warashina: Wit and Wisdom serves as BAM’s Summer 2013 lead exhibit, and honors Warashina’s curiosity, effervescence, and healthy dose of skepticism by featuring approximately 140 of her works which touch on such divergent themes as the human condition, feminism, car‐culture, and political and social topics, which she has used throughout her career to raise questions of social consciousness and life‐cycle mysteries based on two seemingly incompatible influences: current news reports and

Artistry and ecology collide in new site-specific installation at Smithsonian's Sackler Gallery

Indian artist Rina Banerjee’s latest installation, created specifically for the pavilion of the Smithsonian’s Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, takes major Asian river systems as the inspiration for an intricately fabricated world of collected objects, at once fanciful and sinister. On view July 13–June 8, 2014, the installation is part of the Sackler’s contemporary art series, “Perspectives.” Beneath a large suspended dome and an “origin plateau” of black horns, rivers of glass bottles descend and snake across the pavilion floor. Through this geography, Banerjee reimagines major rivers such as the Yangtze and Ganges to evoke their power to both give life and destroy it. Incorporating signature elements of her work—rich fabric, shells, bones, glass vials and plastic objects—she invites the viewer into a glistening and tactile environment, where sharp edges and fragile materials suggest fo

The Frick revisits a series of work created by Vik Muniz during 1999-2000 Pittsburgh residency

The Frick Art Museum opened Clayton Days Revisited: A Project by Vik Muniz featuring a suite of 65 photographs by the internationally renowned contemporary artist that were created during his residency at the Frick in 1999–2000. To complement these photographs, the Frick is also exhibiting ten works from three different recent series created by the artist in the thirteen years since his Frick residency. Frick director Bill Bodine comments, “As the Frick’s first artist in residence more than a decade ago, Vik Muniz provided us with a fresh perspective on Clayton and the significance of the site. We are excited to provide our audience the opportunity to revisit the remarkable suite of images that comprise Clayton Days. Picture Stories by Vik Muniz, along with a compelling selection of recent works by one of the most interesting

ZKM announces the AppArtAward for the best creative developments in the field of mobile applications

In collaboration with its partner CyberForum e.V., for the third consecutive year the ZKM presents the AppArtAward for the best creative developments in the field of mobile applications. This year, the sponsors and patrons CAS Software AG, GFT Technologies AG, GRENKELEASING AG, init AG and the Sparkasse Cultural Foundation Karlsruhe, present the “Award for Artistic Innovation”, the Special Award “Crowd Art” as well as the Special Award “Augmented Reality Art”, each of which are endowed with €10,000. The call for submissions ran from March 11 to May 12 this year, and was directed at artists, designers and developers throughout the world. “Mobile media are art’s contemporary laboratory.” (Peter Weibel) At the time of the original AppArtAward in 2011, any thought about the broad reception the presentation would experience was

Martin Klosterfelde announces he will close his gallery due to personal reasons

Martin Klosterfelde has come to the decision to close his gallery due to personal reasons and is looking forward to new challenges. He is very thankful to his artists, colleagues and the friends of the gallery for the long and inspiring collaborations and support spanning 104 exhibitions over 18 years. The last exhibition ‘In Search of the Miraculous’ by Bas Jan Ader will be on view until August 10, 2013. The Helga Maria Klosterfelde Edition will continue their successfull work with Alfons Klosterfelde at the helm. Dutch born and California-based artist Bas Jan Ader (1942-1975) mysteriously vanished in 1975 when he set sail on what was to be the smallest sailboat ever to journey across the Atlantic during the execution of the second part of his

Norman Rockwell Museum presents "Jarvis Rockwell: Maya, Illusion, and Us"

A singular and visionary image-maker, Jarvis Rockwell, the eldest son of illustrator Norman Rockwell, has forged a path in art that is uniquely his own. This summer, Norman Rockwell Museum explores the continued artistic legacy of the Rockwell family, shining a spotlight on Jarvis Rockwell’s more than 60 years of creative exploration. “Jarvis Rockwell: Maya, Illusion, and Us” is on view July 13 through October 20, 2013. “Jarvis Rockwell: Maya, Illusion and Us” reveals the depth and evolution of the artist’s work—from the early portraits and drawings of his youth, to more recent structural works and assemblages. The retrospective includes a documentary on the artist by filmmaker Rachel Victor; and selections from Rockwell’s extensive toy collection, installed on “Maya V,” a vast, whimsical pyramid inspired by Hindu temples and sculptural deities. Visitors also are encouraged to visit the

Summer starts on a high note at the Art Gallery of Alberta with three new exhibitions

The Art Gallery of Alberta announced three new exhibitions: The Piano (May 25-August 18); New Acquisitions: The Mitchell Endowment (May 25-July 1); and Adam Waldron Blain: does his best (June 29-August 18). Unique programs and events complement these exhibitions including, a baby grand piano turned bar (complete with summer cocktails!). The Piano features work by 13 contemporary artists, which take the form of video projections, performances and sculptural installations—from gutted innards to hammered keys, synchronized scores and the comfort of a piano bar. The works examine the image of the pianist, from the virtuoso to the DIY amateur and the role of the piano, from a hub of bar room entertainment to an instrument of reverie and personal salvation. “Visitors will be immersed in a powerful auditory and visual experience focused on the piano. The works in

The Spectacle of Play now on view at the Art Gallery of Hamilton

In a world of mass entertainment, as well as of social and political upheaval, the notion of play is a loaded concept, touching on our need for pleasurable relief from the strains of our fast-paced and often troubling world. Organized by the Art Gallery of Hamilton, The Spectacle of Play, aims to divert, refresh and entertain viewers and examine the many meanings attached to ‘play,’ especially when so much of our identity today is conceived in terms of work. Play can mean the role played in a theatrical performance (play) or out in the world as a projected image or persona. It can also refer to the range of spectacles routinely on offer—in the past as well as in our current age of web-based, electronic entertainment. While the most literal meaning of play is the playful fun of games, a sporting match—especially in a professional context—involves serious roles and high drama.

Sondheim Artscape Prize exhibition on view at the Walters Art Museum

The Walters Art Museum and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts (BOPA) present the Sondheim Artscape Prize: 2013 Finalists. On view at the Walters June 29–August 11, 2013, the exhibition showcases artwork by the finalists for the annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize, a $25,000 fellowship that is given each year to a visual artist or visual artist collaborators living and working in the Greater Baltimore region. M&T Bank has partnered with BOPA to establish the M&T Bank Sondheim Finalists’ Awards, which provide a $2,500 honorarium for each of the remaining finalists not selected for the fellowship. Gabriela Bulisova (Alexandria, VA); Larry Cook (Landover Hills, MD); Caitlin Cunningham (Baltimore, MD); Nate Larson (Baltimore, MD); Louie Palu (Washington, D.C.); and Dan Steinhilber (Washington, D.C.) are the six finalists. The artists were

Bonnefantenmuseum exhibits contemporary Russian art by artist Katya Bochavar

The Bonnefantenmuseum is presenting the exhibition Rhythm Assignment, with work by the Russian artist Katya Bochavar. Bochavar has wide experience as a curator and director, and in this exhibition she combines her broad expertise with her artistry. The exhibition is taking place as part of the Netherlands-Russia year. Rhythm Assignment shows a drawing by Sol LeWitt from the museum collection, multiplied with the help of video projections and mixed with Bochavar’s geometrical drawings, screens showing video clips of dance movements, and sound machines. The concept of the exhibition is based on the convergence of cultural history and inner development. Katya Bochavar’s development has been influenced by Pavel Filonov, one of the artists whose paintings can still be seen until 11 August in the exhibition The Big Change. Revolutions in Russian painting 1895

Exhibition at Wiels gathers a representative selection of Monir Sharoudy Farmanfarmaian's work

This duo exhibition with Iranian artist Monir Sharoudy Farmanfarmaian was suggested by Belgian artist Jef Geys. Monir is regarded as one of the more inspiring and innovative artists to have come out of Iran. She lived and worked in New York for many years, but the essence of her work has always been the reinterpretation, formal as much as spiritual, of elements of Iranian culture, architecture and traditions. Like Monir, Geys too is interested in geometric forms and their variations, in popular traditions and local customs, in optical illusions and in the beauty and complexity of nature. The show gathers a representative selection of Monir’s work, including eleven old and new mirror-reliefs, twelve object drawings, three disco balls and one sculpture, as well as three new works by Geys, one a major project, paired with a selection of older pieces, such as the video A day, a night, a day…

International Fine Art & Antique Dealers Show to celebrate 25th anniversary

25 years after Brian and Anna Haughton came to New York with the groundbreaking International Antique Dealers Show, their flagship show continues to set the standard in America. With the inception of the “International Show” the Haughtons introduced the European concept of “vetting” in America and also helped to establish New York as part of a larger international fair circuit. The show today is an important part of the cultural, social and philanthropic landscape of New York and remains one of the world’s most prestigious and iconic art and antique events. Sixty-seven of the world’s top dealers converge at the Park Avenue Armory for the dynamic event that collectors, museum curators, interior designers and art lovers anticipate all year long. Extraordinary attention to detail, exceptional specialist dealers, breathtaking variety and exacting standards have

Cooper Occupation Ends With Agreement, Amnesty for Activists

IMG_8491

Students, faculty, and trustees meet at alumnus Michael Lebron’s house in Cooper Square (image via Free Cooper Union)

In a message sent at 4:07 pm to the Cooper Union community, Jamshed Bharucha announced today an agreement with the activist group Free Cooper Union, which had ended its occupation and vacated his office on Friday. The email, which was preceded a few minutes earlier by a campuswide message containing the text of the agreement drawn up with the students, ended on a conciliatory note: “We may not all agree on everything we face but I am committed to lead Cooper Union in a way that places the institution in a strong position for the future.”

But the text of the 526-word agreement provides relatively little in the way of a roadmap, instead loosely sketching out the process for the formation of a small working group to develop, an organ that will work toward a mutually agreeable solution to the ongoing fiscal crisis at Cooper:

The 16-member working group, chaired by trustees Michael Borkowsky and Jeffrey Gural, will consist of trustees, administrators, students, full-time faculty and alumni. It will submit a report to the board by December, for consideration at the board meeting that month.

According to student activist Casey Gollan, the agreement was hammered out at alumnus Micheal Lebron‘s apartment in Cooper Square, and followed specific outreach to the occupying students by trustees Michael Borkowsky and Jeffrey Gural; the two trustees will also be chairing the working group. Members of the group have been promised unfettered access to Cooper records, and Gollan noted that some may be asked to sign non-disclosure agreements before viewing sensitive documents.

But despite these positive developments, and a promised amnesty granted to all involved students from legal and college sanction, things are far from smoothed over. “I still think Jamshed isn’t really around — he’s going on vacation — this isn’t like all wounds are healed, it’s still a strange situation, but at least now we can work on two levels,” student activist Casey Gollan told Hyperallergic. But Gollan echoed fellow Free Cooper Union organizer Victoria Sobel’s sentiment of “cautious optimism.” Gollan added that ultimately “I think it worked out in our favor for now and we’ll see what happens.”

Specially-produced Trustee Matchbooks, each featuring a trustee headshot and bio, distributed by Cooper Union at their very first post-tuition protest.

Specially-produced Trustee Matchbooks, each featuring a trustee headshot and bio, distributed by Cooper Union at their very first post-tuition protest.

The accord also represents a PR respite for Cooper, which had seen its Communications department gutted in recent months by departures allegedly caused by the bungled responses to intensifying waves of student activism. Indeed, the first official announcement that landed in my inbox, after the Free Cooper newsletter from this morning, came from LAK Public Relations, the firm which has apparently been handling Cooper’s PR. The “Non-Profits & Institutions” section of their website notes expertise in “chart[ing] new courses during challenging times.”

The LAK letter was sent about thirty minutes ahead of both the campus-wide announcement and the short note from Jamshed mentioned above. Though it’s probably not worth reading too much into the timelapse, that the story broke hours earlier with the release of the Free Cooper Union newsletter is a fitting conclusion to this whole affair: even in its denouement, Free Cooper controlled the message.

“I don’t think it’s the end of [our] activism,” Gollan said, promising that although the agreement was signed in good faith with Cooper administrators, the end to the present chapter — the occupation of Jamshed’s office — is merely that. Future strategies seem murky. As part of the agreement signed with the administration, students agreed to abide by the school’s Code of Conduct. “Yeah, I think it was complicated — originally in the negotiations it was requested that students promise to leave the [President's] office and never come back again, and that just wasn’t a realistic ask.”

Beyond the spectre of further direct actions, the Free Cooper movement has a difficult road ahead. Although the working group will be granted access to the institution’s most sensitive information, the independent fund that Free Cooper intends to establish (and will likely be an extension of their Money on the Table effort) will almost certainly be precluded from challenging Cooper’s fundraising system, which is the institution’s lifeblood. The group suspect they will be barred from using official alumni databases for soliciting donations; they have already begun building their own lists. And therein lies the test: like every insurrectionary movement, will Free Cooper Union be co-opted by the bargaining table, or will they succeed in building the clout needed to steer the university away from its troubled course?

10 Facts You May Not Know About Artemisia Gentileschi

A self-portrait of Artemisia Gentileschi as an allegory of painting, and the artist's most famous painting, "Judith Slaying Holofernes" (1614–20) (images via Wikipedia)

A self-portrait of Artemisia Gentileschi (1630s), and the artist’s most famous painting, “Judith Slaying Holofernes” (1614–20) (images via Wikipedia)

‘“Who? Signor Galilei? No, he knows nothing of painting. He’s the court mathematician. His head buzzes with only stars and numbers.’”

Signor Galilei? You mean, Galileo Galilei? This was one of the most striking lines in Susan Vreeland’s The Passion of Artemisia, a work of historical fiction about the life of one of the greatest painters of the Baroque era, Artemisia Gentileschi.

9781598873030_p0_v1_s260x420Vreeland chronicles Gentileschi’s life story, one born from her independent character and teenage tragedies. The novel opens with her rape trial, from which she never emotionally recovered, continues on to her forced marriage, her experience with motherhood, and a lifetime of fighting for respect as a woman. Vreeland seamlessly intertwines Gentileschi’s artwork and her strength to carry on even after facing numerous rejections and obstacles. Her paintings come alive as the novel shines a spotlight on how her life and art were interwoven. It is impossible not to see how her own personal experience with the turmoil of rape influences her treatment of traditional stories. Departing from the example of previous Old Masters, like Caravaggio, Gentileschi portrays Judith beheading Holofernes as a powerful actor taking control of the situation. Caravaggio’s Judith, by comparison, is far more passive, and the sword seems to commit the crime with little help from the Biblical heroine.

Throughout the book, many intriguing facts about Gentileschi’s life are mentioned, which inspired me to research the artist’s life and separate the fact from the fiction.

There was one plot point, that I was unfortunately was not able to verify: Gentileschi did not, from what I found, actually own one of Michelangelo’s paintbrushes.

However, here are 10 facts pertaining to her life that you might not know:

  1. Artemisa’s father, Orazio Gentileschi, was in prison with the most famous Baroque artist of them all, Caravaggio. In 1603, Giovanni Baglione brought a libel lawsuit against the pair for writing derogatory verses about his altarpiece. (source)
  2. In 1612, her father brought a lawsuit against his painting companion, Agostino Tassi, for raping his daughter, Artemisia. It it worth noting that Tassi had been imprisoned twice before (once for incest and the second time arranging to have his wife murdered). In addition to these charges, Agostino was also believed to have raped his first wife in Tuscany. Then, when he was living with his wife’s sister, he had children with her. Soon after, Agostino’s sister, Olympia Tassi Bagellis, took him to court for incest with his sister-in-law. (source)
  3. During Artemisia’s rape trial, midwives physically examined her in front of a judge to see if she was still a virgin. (source)
  4. After the trial, she was quickly married off to another painter, Pietro Stiattesi, and the couple then moved to Florence. (source)
  5. She was the first woman ever admitted into the Accademia dell’Arte del Disegno in Florence. (source)
  6. Since she was a woman, she could paint live nude female models. This gave her an advantage over male painters, who were prevented from using live female nude models. (source)
  7. Galileo and Artemisia Gentileschi knew each other, and they both had connections to the Grand Ducal Court in Florence, and they were both members of the Accademia del Disegno. (source)
  8. Gentileschi must have learned a thing or two from Galileo, since the depiction of blood squirting in “Judith Slaying Holofernes” (c. 1620) is in accordance with his discovery of the parabolic path of projectiles. (source)
  9. “Judith Slaying Holofernes” (c. 1620) was most likely made for Cosimo II de’ Medici, the Grand Duke of Tuscany, who hid the painting from view as he believed it was too horrifying to behold. (source)
  10. Artemisia Gentileschi painted a panel entitled “Inclinazione”, commissioned by Michelangelo Buonarotti the Younger, inside of Florence’s Casa Buonarotti. Her first art exhibition was held, incredibly, in 1991 at the same Casa. It is worth noting that up to her rediscovered in the late 20th century, many of her works had been attributed to her father or largely ignored by critics and art historians. (source)

Matthew Morrison’s Show Nods to Cory Monteith at 54 Below

Matthew Morrison opens his cabaret show at 54 Below, to run through Wednesday.

    

A Beatles Tribute Show Seeks Half the Revenues of Another

The musical “Let It Be” begins previews at the St. James Theater on Tuesday, despite a lawsuit by the producers of a previous Beatles tribute show seeking half its revenues.

    

Mayfair Is a Mecca for Art Dealers and Collectors

The elegant Mayfair area of London is luring top American art dealers, who are opening branches there.

    

Music Review: Wendy Sutter and Olga Vinokur Perform at Bargemusic

The cellist Wendy Sutter and the pianist Olga Vinokur assembled a program of contemporary works by Fred Hersch, Andy Akiho, George Crumb and Don Byron at Bargemusic.

    

ArtsBeat: Hopi Artifact Is Returned

A French lawyer who represented the Hopi tribe when it tried to halt a Paris auction of 70 sacred artifacts returned one of the masklike objects to tribal elders on Monday.

    

ArtsBeat: More Tests Needed to Determine Cause of Death of Cory Monteith

Cory Monteith, who played the high-school football star turned glee-squad member on that hit Fox musical comedy, was found dead in his room at the Fairmont Pacific Rim hotel on Saturday.

    

Our Faces, Our Selfies

Detail of the painted ceiling in Waltham Abbey parish church, depicting the two-faced god Janus (photo by Steve Day, via Flickr)

Detail of the painted ceiling in Waltham Abbey parish church, depicting the two-faced god Janus (photo by Steve Day, via Flickr)

CHICAGO — Selfies are part of our voluntary self-exposure in an attempt to take back the images of ourselves, but in the process we also give ourselves away. In the world of online selfies, faces are the focus; bodies tend to appear as afterthoughts. We see a collection of eyes, lips, mouths, noses, and cheekbones, all of which makes facial recognition online that much easier. By voluntarily offering your face to the internet public space, you become a part of the identifiable masses. Isn’t it time you faced yourselfie today?

Amber Watson

Amber Watson, The Facebook Selfie (2013)

Amber Watson, “The Facebook Selfie” (2013)

Occupation: Production assistant
Selfie type: The Defiant Teen-Girl Throwback

The selfie as a medium has roots in adolescence, but it’s about far more than occupying a fluid age space. Sometimes, it’s just about talking to that teen-girl you once were.

“I wish I had something that was profound or funny to say about why I took the selfie, but it was pretty simple,” says Amber about hers. “I took the photo because I was feeling pretty when I took it. Well, actually more than pretty. I felt gorgeous. I’ve always struggled with truly feeling beautiful because I was teased and called ugly for my looks when I was younger. Even though I embrace how I look today, at times I can still feel like that 14-year-old girl who feels awkward and ugly. Now when I look at this particular selfie, its about telling my 14-year-old self, ‘Look at yourself. You’re more than beautiful. You’re fierce, unique, and striking.’”

Dana Martin Davis

Dana Davis, A Parisian Lobster in Kansas City Selfie (2013)

Dana Davis, “A Parisian Lobster in Kansas City Selfie” (2013)

Occupation: COO, Davis Steel
Selfie type: The Long-Arm Lean-In, or a Parisian Lobster in Kansas City

“A selfie means a smile just for me, by me, and a document of a specific item I am wearing or am proposing to wear,” says Davis. ”On a recent trip I lost an important dress at a hotel, and the front and back selfies I shot are my only remaining mementos. A slice in time. Party of one.”

When I asked Davis why she chose to take a selfie with lobster in tow, she offered me a clear and simple explanation: ”I was on my way to an event at the Mint Museum that was a farm-to-food dinner with the F.O.O.D. exhibit going on: ‘Food, Objects, Objectives, Design.’ It was a slam dunk. Hold the butter.”

Sophia Wallace

Sophia Wallace, The Artsy Half-Smile Selfie (2013)

Sophia Wallace, “The Artsy Half-Smile Selfie” (2013)

Occupation: Artist
Selfie type: The Artsy Half-Face Selfie

Sophia Wallace shot this selfie while at a residency in Wassaic, New York. In our Facebook message convo, Sophia tells me that she takes selfies as a way of staying in touch with friends and colleagues through virtual means. This selfie serves as an introduction between her assistant, who was not with her at the residency, and his highness Pantyhose the goat.

“It’s impossible not to ham it up when a goat named Pantyhose is following you,” she says. In order to capture the goat as well, Sophia cropped out her face, making this an artsy half-face selfie of teen-girl and goat.

Timothy Garrison

Timothy Garrison, Beardless Selfie (2013)

Timothy Garrison, “Beardless Selfie” (2013)

Occupation: Library technician
Selfie type: The Just-Shaven

Timothy tells me that this selfie is the product of a year of thinking about hair. He writes the following to me in a Facebook message: “I have had a beard for almost a year, which I let grow without shaping or trimming, but with the understanding that I would shave it all off, if and when it got too hot. That day has come. Last night, after spending an entire warm and humid day thinking about it and telling my friends I might, I shaved it completely off and posted this selfie as a way of letting everyone know. Most of my selfies function as a way of keeping my friends in touch with me, even the friends who rarely see me because they live far away. In this way, I use selfies to remain honest and to demonstrate where I am. I do not see them as self-centered but as a way to stay connected and intimate and current with people I love.”

Carolyn Hopkins 

Carolyn Hopkins, Foggy Selfie (2013)

Carolyn Hopkins, “Foggy Selfie” (2013)

Occupation: Artist, admissions counselor at Pacific Northwest College of Art
Selfie type: The Foggy

Portland-based artist Carolyn Hopkins considers the medium of the selfie and what it is. Her foggy selfie distorts the usual focus on the face.

“That selfie was from a series that I have been doing in foggy windows and mirrors, where the reflection is distorted. I think it’s a nice counterpoint to what selfies usually look like (including mine) — which are hyper-aware and all about you portraying yourself the way you want to be perceived.” By making the selfie foggy and in effect not prominently featuring her face, Hopkins subverts the category. “It just makes the whole point of a selfie sort of mute,” she says.

*   *   *

I, Selfie is a series of ongoing conversations around people working in the medium of the selfie. The selfie imagemakers are accepting themselves as objects and reflecting their images back through the smartphone camera lens. They control the images of themselves that float around these murky virtual waters, but they cannot anticipate how these images will be received or perceived by others who exist in the internet void, a space that we pleasurably and both selfishly and selflessly indulge in. 

Email Hyperallergic your selfie at selfies [at] hyperallergic.com, along with a brief explanation of why you shot it and what it means to you.

Jack Handey Is the Envy of Every Comedy Writer in America

The man behind “Deep Thoughts” and the quest for the one true joke.

    

ArtsBeat: Cojocaru to Join English National Ballet

Alina Cojocaru, who departed the Royal Ballet alongside her partner Johan Kobborg in June, will join the English National Ballet as a “lead principal” next season.

    

Rijksmuseum Acquires One of the Earliest Landscapes of America

Jan Mostaert, "Landscape with an Episode from the Conquest of America" (c. 1535) (via rijksmuseum.nl)

Jan Mostaert, “Landscape with an Episode from the Conquest of America” (c. 1535) (via rijksmuseum.nl) (click to enlarge)

The Rijksmuseum has acquired one of the earliest depictions of America — a painting by Jan Mostaert from circa 1535 titled “Landscape with an Episode from the Conquest of America.”

The work shows an imagined landscape of the recently “discovered” continent, with a scene of the Spanish explorers arriving and fighting the indigenous people. This helps explain why the landscape, though quite beautiful and striking, also looks more otherworldly than realistic. In its announcement of the acquisition, the museum calls the painting “one of the earliest attempts by an artist to give an impression of the new continent” and explains that it’s singular in Mostaert’s ouevre: he was primarily a painter of portraits and religious scenes. “It forms the basis for North Netherlandish landscape painting and, as such, is a milestone in art history.”

Mostaert depicts the indigenous people as naked (and, predictably, very European-looking), which may have been the interpretation or rumor of their appearance at the time: the fresco that includes possibly the first image of Native Americans in European art — from 1494, two years after Columbus came upon America and 41 years before the Monstaert — also shows them nude. There’s now fairly definitive proof that they wore clothing of some sort, but according to the Rijksmuseum, “Mostaert portrayed them as such to contrast the violent Spaniards and the peaceful, heavenly landscape with its ‘unadulterated’ inhabitants.” That makes the painting even more remarkable — not just a Western depiction of the European conquest, but one sympathetic to the Native Americans at that.

There’s no word on how much the museum paid for the painting, but Art Fix Daily reports that it was purchased through Simon Dickinson Gallery, which had been offering it for $14 million at the European Fine Art Fair. The work itself also has an interesting history, having been stolen during World War II from Jewish art dealer Jacques Goudstikker by Nazi minister Hermann Göring for his personal collection. The painting went back to the Netherlands after the war and was displayed at the Frans Hals Museum in Haarlem for a long time. In 2006, it was restituted to Goudstikker’s heirs, and now comes full circle, returning to the hands of the state.

Francis Alÿs: Architect of the Absurd

Francis Alÿs mixes the poetic and the political in his witty, Sisyphean performances and in sculptures, drawings, and
other works that relate to them Read More

Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma

Artist: Gilberto Zorio

Venue: Lia Rumma, Milan

Date: May 9 – July 20, 2013

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma
Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma

Images courtesy of Lia Rumma, Milan/ Naples. Photos by Antonio Maniscalco.

Press Release:

The Lia Rumma Gallery is pleased to announce the solo show by the artist Gilberto Zorio at the space of the gallery in Via Stilicone in Milan.
The exhibition will be developed on the three foors of the gallery, which will alternate between light and darkness. Gilberto Zorio explores space by dealing with themes that oscillate between experience, contrasts and the unknown.

The exhibition begins in the large room on the ground foor with “Torre Stella” (Star Tower), a construction of Gasbeton blocks arranged in a star-shaped plan. Since antiquity, the star is an instrument that has been linked both to orientation and desire. The points of the star will get longer and spread clockwise within the radial area. The interior of the tower will be partly visible and the luminescence caused by the sudden darkness will be clearly visible.

Completing the exhibition on the ground foor are the works “Stella di cuoio su giavellotti”, 2007, a leather star suspended by two spears, “L’Arco che sorregge la stella”, 2008: a star rises at the end of a bow, the base water, sulphate and fuorescein activate the production of crystal salt, that later will cover the structure.

Alchemic signs, which are usually not visible, will appear throughout the room. The foundry ladles are vessels used for the manual transport of crucibles containing incandescent molten bronze which is ready to be poured into the negative mould-valve of the sculpture. The ladles normally act as the tools used to make a sculpture but in Zorio’s show they are transformed into actual art works themselves.
 On the frst foor the show continues with another Star Tower. In the space illuminated by sunlight, the construction spreads into the outdoor area going along the terrace while the work Luci, 1968, (Lights, 1968) tries to complete with the glare of the Sun and is ready to illuminate itself and the ensuing darkness.
 On the second foor, which is in darkness, there will be Pyrex containers, rubber containers, signs and works that are visible thanks to the use of coagulated materials which are frequently employed in Zorio’s work.
 The luminescence and the discharges, the Tesla coils, will occupy privileged positions on the three foors. Light, darkness and exploration are inter-connected themes like the elements that indicate the vessels, the star, the chemical reactions and forms of energy.
 They are forms of energy that have stories to tell.

Link: Gilberto Zorio at Lia Rumma

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

NEWS: Brooke Kamin Rapaport Named Senior Curator of Madison Square Art

Artforum.com

Ibrahim el-Salahi: Out of Africa

Tate Modern is going African with parallel shows from two entirely different artists from across the continent. Ibrahim el-Salahi, born in 1930 and now retired to Oxford, is a veteran of the postwar renaissance in African art and its troubled politics. A minister one moment, imprisoned the next, his painting is a deeply personal search for forms that express his innermost yearnings and the anguish of his prison experience. Meschac Gaba, born in 1961, comes from Benin in West Africa, and is an installation and multidisciplinary artist intent on expressing what Africa means today.

Unpacking the Instawar Aesthetic

"#beach #idf #summer #view #israel #israeldefenseforces #sea #alone #fun #sun #hot #warm" (via @idfonline)

“#beach #idf #summer #view #israel #israeldefenseforces #sea #alone #fun #sun #hot #warm” (via webinstgrm)

The relationship between the Israeli populace and the country’s military is vastly different than the equivalent here in the US. That may sound like an obvious statement, but it’s one that kept coming to mind when I read Hyperallergic staff writer Alicia Eler’s post last week about the Insta-aesthetics of war.

In her piece, Eler draws on Huw Lemmey’s essay in the New Inquiry about the social media campaigns of the Israeli Defense Forces. Lemmey discusses the IDF’s official Instagram account and the emerging “IDF brand,” while Eler brings in personal photos shot by soldiers themselves, wrapping the two strands together into an “Instawar aesthetic.”

There is overlap between the two — as Lemmey points out, on the official IDF Instagram account, “[c]ontent is aggregated from individuals and fed back into the social networks of the target audience,” plus the Instagram filter retro aesthetic unifies pretty much anything that passes through it. Still, I think it’s both interesting and important to break these two categories of photos apart for a minute, to consider the context of each.

From a soldier's personal Instagram account, possibly a selfie? (via electronicintifada.net)

From a soldier’s personal Instagram account, possibly a selfie (via electronicintifada.net)

In Israel, military service is mandatory for anyone over the age of 18. Exceptions are made — sometimes for certain groups, like Israelis of Arab descent, and sometimes for individuals, such as ultra-Orthodox Jews — but generally speaking, army service is a fact of life for most Israelis, far less of a choice than it is here in the US. In America, we’re very touchy about our soldiers and their photos, particularly since Abu Ghraib, because as a nation we have a tentative relationship with our army. We try not to blame the soldiers themselves, but many of us feel increasingly dismayed by the wars they’ve been sent to fight in the past decade. So unless we have personal connections to the military, we tend to just quietly let it be; it’s easier to ignore the complicated realities of Iraq war veterans, after all, by focusing our political energy elsewhere.

In Israel, it’s impossible not to have a personal connection to the military. Most likely, you’ve served in the armed forces yourself, and if not, then you have a purposeful reason for that refusal. The conflict between Israel and Palestine is among the most insidious and crippling in the world, and yet there’s something almost quotidian about being in the Israeli army. Everyone does it, for two or three years, when they’re in their late teens and early twenties. So it seems not only unsurprising but also inevitable that soldiers are now Instagramming photos of themselves in uniform, or even topless while holding guns. Instagram is what people in their late teens and early twenties do. Why would we be “shocked” that they’re smiling? Do we really expect human beings, even human beings carrying out their government’s ruthless operation, to not smile for weeks at a time? That would be, to put it mildly, naive.

An Instagram photo posted by Israeli soldier Eliya Hatan (via electronicintifada.net)

An Instagram photo posted by Israeli soldier Eliya Hatan (via electronicintifada.net)

This isn’t to let all Israeli soldiers and all their photos off the hook. As has been documented elsewhere, there are some disturbing pictures that have been Instagrammed, including one showing a Palestinian boy in the sight of a gun. Such photos are chilling, largely because they seem to reveal a profoundly unsettling reality that’s often cast in dispute. Many Jews, particularly American ones, like to harp on the vilification of the Israelis by Palestinians, but a lot less gets said about the indoctrination on the Israeli side of things. (That silence may be a defensive measure against anti-Israel sentiments that often bleed into anti-semitism from other groups.)

All of this, I think, is distinct from the IDF’s official Instagram feed. There, the photos are clear propaganda, lifestyle branding, an attempt to gloss over the realities of war. Particularly through the use of filters, which, Lemmey writes:

… [remove] the images of today’s IDF from their context within the current campaign of blockade and air assault and reframes them as part of the Israeli foundation story. These images are not to be judged alongside the grainy cameraphone footage of bodies being pulled from rubble, Hamas propaganda on forums and youtube channels, or Al-Jazeera coverage of Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh and Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi visiting wounded Palestinians in hospital. Instead the historic imagery invoked is of conflicts that have already been morally justified — the 1948 Arab-Israeli war, the Six-Day War and the Yom Kippur War, for example.

Two official IDF Instagram account photos (left via webinstgrm, right via Flickr)

Two official IDF Instagram account photos (left via webinstgrm, right via Flickr)

Many of the official IDF photos do depict individual soldiers, but they’re so polished as to be almost comical. Soldiers hug dogs, hold hands with children, grin through the stripes of their war paint, cheer during physical exercises. This is Propaganda 101. These are the posters in your Jewish Zionist day-school classroom. They may inspire pride in some Israelis and Jews, but from where I sit, their staginess is the exact opposite of what makes social media engaging.

A soldier's shadowy Instagram photo of a nighttime raid (click to enlarge) (via electronicintifada.net)

A soldier’s shadowy Instagram photo of a nighttime raid (click to enlarge) (via electronicintifada.net)

Compare those with the pictures coming from the personal accounts of soldiers — tired faces attached to bodies weighted with gear, blurry nighttime shots of raids, cocky guys pointing guns at the camera — and the difference is stark. The former attempt to soften the IDF through a message of universal humanity; the latter reflect the messiness of actual humanity, opening up a space of moral and psychological complexity and ambiguity.

It’s for this reason that I find the official IDF photos more nefarious than soldier selfies, even though the former may seem, at first glance, less harmful. State propaganda sprinkled into your Instagram feed is the stuff of which Orwell novels are made; photos by Israeli teen soldiers are windows onto a conflict that remains, for all of the writing and fighting and policy making, shrouded in misinformation, perpetually in the dark.

ArtsBeat: Thom Yorke Pulls Songs From Spotify

The Radiohead frontman said that the streaming music service pays too little in royalties, and removed his solo recordings and music by his band Atoms for Peace.

    

Crying Webcam Tears

Screenshot of WebCam Tears

Screenshot of WebCam Tears

CHICAGO — I cry, you cry, we fuck each others’ feelings, we broke up, we got back together, and somehow it all ended up on Tumblr. What is crass and private is public and affective, considered just another aspect of affect, of gaining likes, retweets and reblogs through sharable, likable emotions. Internet culture workers whose source of currency is emotion, and who are paid in thought provocation, acknowledgment and attention, know this all too well. As in any relationship, the more you give, the more you get. But when you are giving to the internet, where consumption is neverending and needs are ever-increasing, the emotions are endless. The internet is a goldmine of creative capital, but this currency doesn’t always pay dividends, and often times it’s not something one can cash in at the local currency exchange.

Two embodiments of this sort of affective labor can be found in the Tumblrs WebCam Tears and MarinaAbromavicMadeMeCry, in which moments of extreme emotion are mediated through the internet, appearing cleanly curated and sterile, yet erupting with bodily sensations, feelings, stuff that makes you want to stare and do something, maybe even get off. In this affective space, the body is fragmented yet the feelings remain. If you, the internet, fuck my feelings, there’s nothing I can do to get you off.

WebCamTears is a collection of videos and gifs of mostly white young women crying in front of a webcam, most likely toward or about the human who is receiving these images on the other end. The images are anonymous; names do not appear.

This woman only made it 5 minutes before Marina made her cry. Date: 2010-06-05.

This woman only made it 5 minutes before Marina made her cry. Date: 2010-06-05.

Anyone on the internet is welcome to submit videos of themselves crying (sorry, no more photos or gifs). As the statement for WebCamTears suggests, the Tumblr collection becomes a project about voyeurism, exhibitionism and loneliness, but also considers the idea of emotional porn. The majority of these videos aren’t recognizable. We did, however, notice a video of Maja Malou Lyse crying, which we recognized from a similar work of art that appeared in Illuminati Girl Gang ,Volume 3.

In an age where connecting or reconnecting is but a click, like, or message away, and our emotions are easily transmittable through fluid spaces such as email, Tumblr, Facebook and iMessages, emotional connectivity might be even easier to find than we realize. Bodies become fragmented, afterthoughts of feelings and internet pornography. Feelings are immediately exchanged and activated, but once they’ve been “sold” to the internet they cannot ever be refunded. And like porn, they’ll get you off and you won’t have to do anything in return except watch and enjoy. You may feel gross afterwards, but that’s the price to pay.

The man also only made it 5 minutes before he broke down in front of Marina.

The man also only made it 5 minutes before he broke down in front of Marina.

Marina Abromamovic, who is quite possibly the convergence of two sides of a coin—both the death-toller and ‘grandmother of performance art’ — invoked tears in the eyes of many visitors to her MoMa exhibition Marina Abramović: The Artist Is Present (2010). Her ability to make complete strangers cry just through sustained human connectivity calls into question ideas of “real, authentic emotions.”

Abramovic’s performance at MoMa, easily memed and tumbled, presents an extension of performance in late capitalism, where emotions are currency, pornography and readily available for consumption. Despite this shift, we still lack the bodies that connect us physically, a trading of physicality for pure affect. WebCam Tears and Abramović’s performances operate first physically, and only later affectively on the performance-driven space of the internet. Crying, whether it occurs alone in front of a screen or with a stranger at a museum, is still always connected to the body, regardless of how fragmented it appears online. Emotional currency is still first and foremost only dispensible through the body. Turning on the tears, however, isn’t quite as simple as a faucet, and isn’t always resemble an easily replenishable well.

Huge financial scandal in Venice

Corruption charges over flood barrier bring seven arrests, including the former president of the agency in charge of its building

NEWS: Brooke Kamin Rapaport Named Senior Curator of Mad Square Art

Artforum.com

ArtsBeat: Matthew Morrison Performs, Addressing Death of Cory Monteith

On Sunday afternoon, Matthew Morrison took the stage after the death of his “Glee” co-star Cory Monteith.

    

NEWS: Doryun Chong Named Chief Curator of M+

Artforum.com

Artists deny nature terrorism

Icelandic police look abroad for those responsible for spray-painting giant words on rocky landscape

ArtsBeat: After Performer’s Death, Cirque du Soleil Show Will Resume

Cirque du Soleil will resume performances of “Ka” on Tuesday night, about two weeks after Sarah Guillot-Guyard, an aerialist and acrobat, was killed in an accident at the show.

    

Architect of the Absurd

Francis Alÿs mixes the poetic and the political in his witty, Sisyphean performances and in sculptures, drawings, and
other works that relate to them Read More

ArtsBeat: Cultural Programs to Focus on Climate Change

The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation is joining with two other like-minded organizations to present exhibitions, panel discussions and performances that will explore climate change.

    

A Painter’s Retreat: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George

LakeGeorge-640

Lake George, 1922, oil on canvas, 16 ¼ x 22 in., San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Gift of Charlotte Mack (image © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Glen Falls, NY — An ambitious exhibition on view this summer at the Hyde Collection is the first of its kind to explore the formative influence of Lake George on the art and life of Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986). O’Keeffe, the great Maiden of American Modernism, is celebrated most for the existential paintings she created out in the dry air of New Mexico, but as this exhibition attests, the works painted on the shore and in the hills around New York’s Lake George are among the most prolific and transformative of her seven-decade career.

The Hyde Collection is an extraordinary place, one of the few of its kind in upstate New York. A product of the golden age of the private art collector, it’s a prime example of the rare genre of museums created during the American Renaissance. Turned into a public museum by Charlotte Pruyn Hyde in 1952, she dedicated her estate and art collection to the community. Her two story house — the Hyde House — was constructed between 1910 and 1912 in the style of an Italian Renaissance palazzo and architecturally inspired by the Isabella Stewart Gardner’s Fenway Court in Boston.

The collection within consists of over 3,330 objects that span the history of Western art from Old Masters such as Sandro Botticelli, Rembrandt, Peter Paul Rubens, and El Greco’s “Portrait of St. James the Less” to modern masters such as Matisse and blue period Picasso in Mrs. Hyde’s Bedroom. The Hyde also contains a fine assortment of American art, with works by George Bellows, Thomas Eakins, Winslow Homer and — my favorite discovery — an Arthur B. Davies painting of Salt Lake, Utah, hanging in the Down Guest Bedroom. The O’Keeffe exhibition is located in the Woodward Gallery a modern building located adjacent to the Hyde House. It’s a fitting venue for an intimate look at O’Keeffe.

Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George offers sixty paintings dating from 1918-1934. Curated by Erin B. Coe (Chief Curator at the Hyde), and Barbara Buhler Lynes (former curator of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum), the exhibit is divided into six themes: Landscapes, Barns and Buildings, Abstractions, Tree Portraits, From the Garden, and Lake George Souvenirs. The exhibition also includes significant loans from dozens of major collecting institutions from across the United States and is quite a coup for the Hyde.

Petunias, 1925, Oil on board, 18 x 30 in. Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Museum purchase, Gift of the M. H. de Young Family, 1990.55 / © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Petunias, 1925, Oil on board, 18 x 30 in. Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Museum purchase, Gift of the M. H. de Young Family, 1990.55 (image © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York)

O’Keeffe’s relationship with Lake George dates back to the time surrounding when she declared her interest in becoming a painter. As a young student in 1908 she won the William Merritt Chase Still Life Prize from the Art Students League, New York. The award offered her a place in the League’s outdoor summer school at Amitola on Lake George. The summer would have a lasting impression, as it would mark the first time O’Keeffe painted outdoors. The experiences that summer would lead quite possibly, as Hunter Drohojowska-Phillips suggested in his book Full Bloom: The Art and Life of Georgia O’Keeffe, “to her realization that the landscape could act as metaphor for the tumult of emotion.”

Ten years later, in June 1918, having exhibited with Alfred Stieglitz’s 291 the year prior, O’Keeffe accepted Stieglitz’s invitation to move to New York permanently and devote herself entirely to her art. Later that year, O’Keeffe made her first sojourn to the Stieglitz’s family estate situated just north of Lake George Village along the western shoreline of Lake George in New York’s Adirondack Park. The estate would serve as a rural retreat for O’Keeffe from 1918 to 1934 and the artist’s most productive period of her career creating more than 200 paintings on canvas and paper in addition to sketches and pastels.

O’Keeffe sought to transcribe ineffable thoughts and emotions through many of her early abstractions. Very often the composition evoked the spirit of place, which became essential to her modern approach to the natural world. In 1918, O’Keeffe began a series of abstract paintings titled simply Series I. This series was the subject of an important study of O’Keeffe’s largely unexplored oeuvre organized by the Whitney Museum five years ago. The Whitney exhibition was celebrated as an overdue acknowledgment of her place as one of America’s first abstract artists. Two examples from this series, both painted at Lake George in 1919, Series I-No. 10A and Series I, No. 10 are on view at the Hyde.

Lake George, Coat and Red (1919) is a strong little painting on loan from the Museum of Modern Art. Vibrant in color with high chromes of red and blue, the work brings to mind the era of early American Modernism, recalling the works of Stanton MacDonald-Wright (whom Stieglitz also actively supported). Yet O’Keeffe’s work is much more assertive in its composition and deliberate in its brushwork. It’s suggested that the large swelling form is an evocation of Stieglitz himself, who often wore a dark cape lined in red.

O’Keeffe liked to paint what she saw and at Lake George she learned to paint on the spot. “Lake George with Crows” (1921) captures O’Keeffe’s blunt spontaneity. Three crows circle the center of the dark blue lake. Deep autumnal mountains cut the composition from upper left to lower right exposing slightly a cloud-covered moon sitting high in a silvery sky. It is O’Keeffe at her greatest, where she deliberately defines space then allows the paint to organically express her vision. ”Lake George with Crows” is one of the rare times O’Keeffe ever painted birds.

“I wish you could see the place here,” O’Keeffe wrote to the writer Sherwood Anderson from Lake George, “there is something so perfect about the mountains and the lake and the trees-Sometimes I want to tear it all to pieces—it seems so perfect-but it is really lovely […]”

O’Keeffe completed twenty landscapes while at Lake George. Many following similar, yet essential, composition elements as seen in “Lake George” (formerly “Reflection Seascape”) (1922) with its long band of lake as horizon and a distinctive mountain range as seen from the Stieglitz’s Estate. With its subtle greens and smoky grays the painting captures a slow and sublime pace of her summer retreat.

Starlight Night, Lake George (1922), Oil on canvas, 16 x 24 in. Private Collection / © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Starlight Night, Lake George (1922), Oil on canvas, 16 x 24 in. Private Collection (image © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

O’Keeffe often spoke about painting “like the men do.” It’s hard not to see a little Van Gogh in O’Keeffe’s “Starlight Night, Lake George” (1922). Painted in the fall of 1922, the stars hover in orbits in a deep blue night’s sky while two lights glimmer, reflect in the lake. The organic undulation of the water is O’Keeffe at her best as we all but feel the cool breeze rippling off the dark lake. The work is a mature incarnation of an earlier work, the watercolor, “Starlight Night” (1917), which so pleased her that she later had it reproduced as her Christmas card.

O’Keeffe’s fascination with trees overtook her interest in the lake. In all, she painted twenty-nine arboreal portraits of which many are on view at the Hyde. Three in particular, “Tree with Cut Limb” (1920), “The Chestnut Grey” (1924), and “The Old Maple, Lake George” (1926) where among my favorite as O’Keeffe imbues each with a distinct emotion. In “Tree with Cut Limb” we sympathize with the pain of a severed branch. In “The Chestnut Grey,” we partake of the wisdom whispered through the wind of the Chestnut’s aged and lumberous limbs. She painted the same tree twice, once at sunrise and this one at sunset. “If only people were trees…” O’Keeffe told an interviewer in 1927, “I might like them better.”

The Chestnut Grey, 1924, Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 1/8 in. Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis, MN/ © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The Chestnut Grey, 1924, Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 1/8 in. Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis, MN (image © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

O’Keeffe closely crops the composition of “The Old Maple, Lake George” (1926) to bring us closer to the gnarled surface of the old tree which she paints like old bones. “The Old Maple” is a prelude of the O’Keeffe to come. Returning to Lake George from her first trip out west in 1929, O’Keeffe brought back “a barrel of bones.” As she describes in the 1977 documentary of her work:

When it was time to go home, I felt as though I hadn’t even started on the country and I wondered what I could take home that I could continue what I felt about the country and I couldn’t think of anything to take home but a barrel of bones. So when I got home with my barrel of bones to Lake George, I stayed up there quite a while that fall and painted. That’s where I painted my first skulls, from this barrel of bones.

The resulting paintings would become two of her most celebrated compositions. First, “Horse’s Skull on Blue” (1930), and second “Cow’s Skull: Red, White, and Blue” (1931).

From the Lake, No. 3, 1924, Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 in. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe for the Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1987 / © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

From the Lake, No. 3, 1924, Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 in. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe for the Alfred Stieglitz Collection, 1987 (image © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

While representational imagery dominated the Lake George years, pure abstraction remained at the heart of her work. I was thrilled to see three magnificent examples in the exhibition at the Hyde including “From the Lake, No. 3″ (1924), Pink Abstraction” (1929) and “Green Grey Abstraction” (1931). “Pink Abstraction” was painted during a spring visit to Lake George. “Green Grey Abstraction” was considered by O’Keeffe to be a portrait, a work like many “that have passed into abstraction while no one really knew what they were,” she said in 1976. “Green Grey” was a gift to Jane Weinberg in 1954 purchased from Downtown Gallery by her husband to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary. Ms. Weinberg tells a wonderful story of meeting O’Keeffe:

I asked her if she would tell me about [the painting]. [O’Keeffe] froze and said only, “It’s all there.”

[…] [O’Keeffe] asked if I had read the Art of Zen Archery. I had and had been interested and impressed by it. She said the painting was like that; it wasn’t part of any series; it had come out whole and she never had to change it or make another. Usually she knew ahead of time what she wanted to paint, but had to work on her paintings. This one was different. Had I noticed the star on the back of the painting? She only put stars on paintings she especially liked.

It is typical of O’Keeffe to suggest that the most abstract image might be most meaningful. As the exhibition at the Hyde suggests, it was at Lake George that she realized that she did not desire to capture the surface appearance of things. Instead, she labored to eliminate some things and emphasize others in order to, as she put it, “get at the real meaning of things.”

There are wonderful examples of paintings of apples and fallen leaves in the exhibition as well as red cannas and grey barns. And there is on view the only painting she made of apple blossoms.

A final series of paintings titled Jack-in-Pulpit (1930), in which No. II-VI are on exhibit, offers an analytical step-by-step progression of O’Keeffe’s move towards abstraction. The series begins with the striped hooded bloom rendered with her distinct botanist’s care, continues with successively more abstract and tightly focused depictions, and ends with the essence of the jack-in-the-pulpit, a haloed black pistil standing alone against a black, purple, and gray field. As if the flower was a problem she was trying to solve, O’Keeffe systematically eliminates, crops, and tucks, reducing the observable world into its most essential, meaningful form. O’Keeffe explains here:

I have a series of paintings of Jack-in-the Pulpits. At Lake George we had a good many Jack-in-the-Pulpits. My first one was almost photographic. It was about 10×12. And the next one got up to be 30×36. And the next one was 30×40. And in that one the jack got black. Well, then I made an abstract thing of all the different parts of the jack and then it got to be 48 inches high. And then I thought I ought to be able to simplify it more than that, and then I thought well the thing that makes you interested in that flower, and that you wouldn’t look at the flower without, is the jack in the middle of it. So I painted just the jack.

After her she discovered New Mexico, O’Keeffe would spend less and less time in Lake George. As she put it she had found “her country.” By the early 1930s she had established a routine of heading to Ghost Ranch for the summer, returning to Lake George in the late fall (her favorite season) and spending the winter in New York City where she still took responsibility for Stieglitz’s day to day needs.

“The Lake George years in my view are so vitally important,” Curator Erin B. Coe recently told North Country Public Radio, “because they coincide with [O’Keeffe’s] devolvement and evolution as an artist and really set the stage for her entire career.”

This exhibition does much to illustrate that her experiences on Lake George remained with her for rest of her brilliant career. To see so many works returned to their place of origin, is the greatest aspect of this show. I think even grumpy old O’Keeffe herself would find some cheer in that.

Modern Nature: Georgia O’Keeffe and Lake George is on view at The Hyde Collection (161 Warren Streeet, Glens Falls, New York) through September 15, 2013 after which it will tour to Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, NM, October 4, 2013-January 26, 2004 and Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, de Young Museum, February 8-May 11, 2014. A full illustrated catalogue with essays by Erin B. Coe, Bruce Robertson, and Gwendolyn Owens accompanies the exhibition.

James Lee Byars at Maccarone

Artist: James Lee Byars

Venue: Maccarone, New York

Exhibition Title: I Can’t Stand to Look at The Earth

Date: June 7 – July 19, 2013

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccarone
James Lee Byars at Maccaronex

Images courtesy of Maccarone, New York

Press Release:

Maccarone is pleased to present I Can’t Stand to Look at The Earth, an exhibition of works by James Lee Byars, from the collection of Mr. Bob Landsman and Mrs. Sandra Lang, on view from June 7 – July 19, 2013.

The ungraspable American artist James Lee Byars’ conceptual practice can be most plainly defined as sculpture, painting, and performance. His manifold output remained interchangeable with his identity, rendering the boundary between art and life indiscernible. Byars’ tireless pursuit of “the perfect” can be considered a quest for an essential truth, evidencing the core of his worldview and personal ideologies. With this consideration, what we experience as Byars’ “work,” the atmospheres in which he created, is merely the outline of a reality, a glimpse into the parallel dimension in which he spent his time. This version of reality stands as the real work, which remains invisible to us all.

I Can’t Stand to Look at The Earth focuses on the ever present and ever changing relationship between the miniature and the monumental that permeates nearly all of Byars output by way of grandeur, opulence, magic, and invisible gestures. His sharp-witted employment of scale, whether for an act or an object, served to disrupt the expectations and conventions of daily life, transforming our world into his. Byars met Bob Landsman in Japan in the 1960s and, as he did with many friends and colleagues, nurtured their life long friendship with a steady stream of mysterious gifts and mailed correspondence ranging from art works, to elaborately and sometimes convolutedly written and packaged letters, artist books, postcards and found objects.

Within this exhibition, these objects of delicacy serve as both reliquaries of Byars as legend and more specifically as a record of his fascination with significance of scale. His large early paintings executed in Japan depict solid black shapes eclipsing the vast majority of white backgrounds, grand yet never heavy. More minute relics demonstrate the elaborate production processes that Byars developed collaboratively with different fabricators, notably the use of microscopic text (so small that at first glance appears as a flaw or imperfection) printed on surfaces ranging from pieces of confetti to a single glass marble-sized ball and a large plate glass disc quietly reminiscing on “a drop of black perfume”.

We are left with Byars mystical messages, traces, and unanswerable questions of existence in their myriad of formations. Some of the smallest things, functionless and perfect, possess the grandest of energy. Perhaps for what is considered such an enigmatic life, this is the most palpable, what Dave Hickey once referred to as the Byarsian “abbreviated opera”, called up here in a ouija board of tissue papers, string, collected leaves, and so on, once again reclaiming the universe as his own.

This exhibition is organized in collaboration with NYU Steinhardt Visual Arts Administration MA program graduates led by Cristina Tafuri. Special thanks to Ellen Langan, Jonathan Berger, Klaus Ottman, 80 Washington Square East Galleries, and Michael Werner Gallery.

Link: James Lee Byars at Maccarone

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

The Fear of Leaving an Art Work Unfinished

almostfinished-640

Just let it go?

Rising costs in Hong Kong criticised

Government officials plans to try blocking additional funding for West Kowloon Cultural District

Design: Expanding the Definitions of Design

Using the design process in new contexts is more than a passing fancy.

    

#Hashtags: Punk Is Dead, Long Live Punk

#punk #institutions #historicity #commerce #style

Is the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Punk: Chaos to Couture the death knell of punk as a social and cultural movement? Certainly, the Met’s assertion that the locus of punk’s importance is in its influence on high fashion would indicate that it is no longer relevant to these larger concerns. The A-list attendees at May’s opening gala were decidedly mainstream and largely advocates for materialistic values. Sarah Jessica Parker, whose iconic Sex and the City character relentlessly equated emancipation with consumption, was the event’s poster child. She drew attention from both art and celebrity gossip media with a fauxhawk designed by Philip Treacy, a milliner whose rise to fame has depended on the support of the same royal family that the Sex Pistols skewered with “God Save the Queen” back in 1977.

430 King's Road Period Room

Gallery view. 430 King's Road Period Room. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The exhibition makes the pretense of celebrating punk as a historical moment, but it fails to establish historical context. Like the replicas of CBGB’s men’s room and Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren’s Chelsea boutique, history itself has been sanitized and aired out. Little mention is made of the crushing poverty and urban blight that nearly destroyed both New York and London in the 1970s, prompting young people with few prospects to take up a nihilistic, antagonistic posture symbolized by a violent, abject aesthetic. No mention at all is made of black cultural influence, from Rude Boys to Sharps, on the punk style and ethic.

The parallels with our own era are all too clear. Then, as now, economic and social elites flaunted their wealth while average people struggled to gain education and employment in the shadow of prolonged and expensive overseas wars. People lost faith in government and institutions, revolutions roiled the Global South, and gas prices soared. People of color found their cultural contributions absorbed and erased by the white mainstream. Yet while Queen Elizabeth II’s Silver Jubilee in 1977 sparked parody and revolt, last year’s Diamond Jubilee protests were fairly tame and skewed much older. Punk in the 1970s provided an artistic and social outlet for the youth whom society was failing. Today it would seem to be just another fad, notable for its influential style and its innovative materialism but stripped of its conscience.

DIY Hardware

Gallery view. D.I.Y.: Hardware. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

What is punk’s appeal to couturiers? The Met argues that punk’s use of postindustrial materials and unconventional symmetries inspires fashion designers. However, these elements have their own provenance in Process Art, Dada, Gutai, and Neo-Concretism, all of which are canonical art movements that predate the 1970s. There is a deeper reason why punk has been selected to get the Met’s revisionist treatment, aside from its global appeal as a major movement in rock music and graphic art. Punk’s anti-corporate message and its anarchic ethic have as much pull on the public imagination as ever, and the only bulwark against their power is that public’s collective amnesia. The Met has seized on a perfect narrative, one that defangs punk’s political relevance and frames its influence as limited to specific (Western) geographies and (bygone) eras. By doing so, the museum and the fashion houses it represents here can appeal to the 1% and its appetite for cultural appropriation and regurgitation while rendering an oppositional movement impotent and excising its practitioners from the narrative. It’s no accident that Debbie Harry is the only living punk artist in gala photographs, which feature manufactured celebrities like Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus doing clichéd Sid Vicious impersonations.

Punk was a DIY movement that sprung up in opposition to the hippies but shared many similar values. Among these were communal living in self-organizing “punk house” communes and a post-Marxist quest for connection to the fruits of one’s labor through craft. Making is a critical aspect of the punk ethos, which celebrates individuality and resourcefulness in expressing it. The display of early T-shirts by Vivienne Westwood demonstrates how closely punk was connected to a working-class history of agitprop printmaking. The Met show features dresses made from plastic bags (Maison Martin Margiela, Moschino) or sprayed with paint (Alexander McQueen, Anne Demeulemeester) and adorned with hundreds of safety pins and studs. The look and feel of the clothes is often spot-on, but the sense of acquisitive desire that they invoke in the viewer is antithetical to punk’s call to create rather than consume.

DIY Bricolage

Gallery view. D.I.Y.: Bricolage. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Most importantly, by locating Punk’s significance solely at its origin as a European-American movement of the 1970s, the Met exhibition overlooks punk’s continued value as an egalitarian ethos of the young, opposed to the greed and totalitarianism of the old. Nowhere is punk more relevant today than in the Islamic world. Teens in Indonesia have been subjected to forced head-shaving and re-education for wearing punk fashion in recent years. Inspired by the Riot Grrl stylings of Ukrainian protest group FEMEN, Tunisian feminist activist Amina Sboui created a furor earlier this year for posting images of herself online, topless and sporting a bleached-blond punk haircut à la Wendy O. Williams. Beats for Bangladesh, a compilation featuring US-based Taqwacore and South Asian hip-hop acts, was recently released to benefit survivors of the Rana Plaza fire that brought dismal overseas working conditions in the fashion industry to international attention. These cases make clear that punk is more than a Western cultural export for consumption; it is a wake-up call to youth that they must take their futures into their own hands. Mass protests in Egypt and Turkey are part of the same awakening, prompted by anger at corrupt governments and reactionary beliefs. In the Global South, revolution remains imperative. We may have forgotten why punk was invented, but it’s reinvented every day.

Punk: Chaos to Couture is on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through August 14, 2013.

Philipp Ronnenberg

06-Social-Teletext-Network 05-Social-Teletext-Network Screen Shot 2013-07-14 at 10.23.26 PM 03-OpenPositioningSystem

Philipp Ronnenberg

Work from Post Cyberwar Series

“Post Cyberwar proposes three appropriate methods to prepare for the time after a cyberwar:

Introduction

An Internet kill switch is a countermeasure against cybercrime; it is based on the concept of activating a single shutting-off mechanism for all Internet traffic. The theory behind a kill switch is the creation of a single point of control managed by one authority in order to shut down the Internet to protect it from unspecified assailants.

The prospect of cyber warfare over the 2000s prompted US officials to draft special legislation for the Internet, but the implications of actually “killing” the Internet has spurred worldwide criticism. During the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, access to the Internet was restricted in an effort to limit online peer networking that would facilitate self-organization. Despite the controversial effects of shutting off access to information, the activation of a kill switch remains an issue to be resolved.

Social Teletext Network

The Teletext Social Network uses analogue television broadcasting to provide a wireless communication infrastructure. Users can communicate without depending on network providers or governmental institutions. The network users themselves maintain the network.

In 2012, most of the broadcasting television channels in the UK switched from analogue to digital broadcasting, resulting in the analogue spectrum frequencies becoming free.

Sewer Cloud

The insertion of data into the DNA is developed, amongst other reasons, to solve the problem of data storage. 1 gram of DNA is capable of storing up to 700 terabytes of data. This scientific development could provide alternative uses and novel ways of exposure of data.

The Sewer Cloud project explores the possibilities of this discovery and how people in urban areas could use it.

The Sewer Cloud is a living, self-reproducing data network in the sewerage system of London. This living network is based on the insertion and extraction of data into the algae species Anabaena bacteria, which lives in water.

Data insertion and extraction out of algae could be regarded as a ‘grey area’ act; it would be legal to do so, but a lot of content that one could find in this network could be illegal. Corner shops would be providing machines where the extractions and insertions would take place.

OpenPositioningSystem

The OpenPositioningSystem is an open navigation system. This means that it is not run or controlled by companies. The goal of the system is to gather interested people on the web platform OpenPS.info to develop the necessary software, hardware and testing processes. Anybody who is interested, from beginner to professional can participate and contribute their knowledge to the community and through this system.

The idea is to use seismic activity, produced by generators in power plants, turbines in pumping stations or other large machines running in factories. These generators, machines etc. are producing seismic waves, distributed through the ground. The sensor prototype can detect seismic waves on the ground and on walls.

When at least three signals are received and their positions on a map are known, one can calculate the position within these three signals via triangulation and the signal strength.” -Philipp Ronnenberg

Dance Review: ‘Forever Tango’ Incudes ‘Dancing With the Stars’ Alumni

The Puerto Rican singer Gilberto Santa Rosa and the Ukrainian-born dancers Karina Smirnoff and Maksim Chmerkovskiy star in a revival of Luis Bravo’s popular “Forever Tango.”

    

The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu

The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik

Architects: Vilen Künnapu
Location: ,
Interior Design: Vilen Künnapu, Aet Seire
Paintings: August Künnapu
Elephant Sculpture: Vilen Künnapu, Vambola Mets
Area: 350 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Arne Maasik

I met the lady of the Elephant House years ago in the gym of Viimsi SPA Hotel. Doing rowing exercises with ergometer, Kristi and I got talking and discovered we had many interests in common. The nice young lady worked as a doctor, but was also fascinated with everything alternative. Then Kristi vanished for several years and turned up again fairly recently. She phoned and said we were going to build a house. I met her husband Tarmo as well, a civil servant, whose interest in art and personal talent quickly made us firm friends.

The solution of the Elephant House largely rests on the initiative of the young clients with their extravagant wishes, my growing keenness on heavy, stronghold-like architecture and a need to produce colourful solutions. I remember that the clients sent me a picture of a weird house from a computer game, with mammoths, Gothic windows and technological screens. I was certain I was pretty crazy, but was I crazy enough to satisfy the clients? In the course of work, the mammoths were replaced with a sculpture of an elephant calf, the Gothic windows with elongated slits and a few curved windows.

Travelling towards Maardu from Tallinn along the Muuga road, we come to the plot about a hundred metres from the border of Maardu. I drew a strong façade screen crosswise with the big road, which ends with a wall where a light blue little elephant welcomes the arrivals into town. The world behind the screen is divided into two. The lower part has the medical centre and the higher part is the residence for the couple and their two children.

Colours play an essential role in the solution. The main exterior colour is orange, supplemented in details by lemon yellow, light blue and pink. The interior is dominated by white, beige, yellow, orange, red, bluish-green and pink. The harmony of colours perfectly fits August Künnapu’s large-format paintings in the residence entrance hall and with smaller pictures in the doctor’s waiting room. In the centre of the waiting room is a sculpture designed by the current author, which I see as a time machine or a healing stupa. The walls around the stupa display three round pictures of cats, one picture of a doctor and a painting showing Brezhnev together with Tajik peasants (all by August).

The first floor of the residential house accommodates a hall, garage, gym and kitchen-dining room. The second floor has a living room, 3 bedrooms, an office and a stairwell with light coming from above, also presenting a few of my small sculptures and 2 pictures of the first sketches and watercolours of the house. The large bathroom has a round window opening into the stairwell and to the painting where a girl is taking off a stocking. These pictures have the air of the 1920s about them. I notice that the architecture of the house as a whole somewhat resembles a sense of Art Deco of the 1920s and 1930s. The tops of the New York skyscrapers, after all, constitute energy towers of a kind.

We can say that the entire elephant House is in a sense a time machine, which leads us into a parallel magic world. Or it could be a ship where the passengers take a long journey across the ocean called Life.

The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu © Arne Maasik
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu Floor Plan
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu Floor Plan
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu Site Plan
The Elephant House (Villa Kristi) / Vilen Künnapu Section

Can Craft Beer Rebuild Neighborhoods?

Can Craft Beer Rebuild Neighborhoods? Brooklyn Brewery, Williamsburg, Brooklyn.  Courtesy of Flickr User Wally Gobetz

Gentrification has been a running theme in the social and economic fluctuations that occur in . Between housing booms and busts, the revitalization of small manufacturing and the shifting populations of grow and change organically, subject to a variety of trends.

Recently on Business Insider, Tali Arbel traced urban revival by following the successes of craft breweries that have sprung up in desolate and blighted neighborhoods. In many cases, brewers have found a home in cities full of abandoned warehouses and factory buildings where real estate is available and affordable.  As these neighborhoods become more affluent, rising in trendiness and popularity, they are beginning to price out these same businesses that helped establish them. This leads to the question, “Where are these businesses to go and how can gentrifying neighborhoods protect social and economic diversity?”

The arrival of these craft breweries was one of the sparks that revived neighborhoods in Cleveland in the late 1980s and neighborhoods like Williamsburg, Brooklyn in the 1990s.  ”New businesses bubbled up around breweries, drawing young people and creating a vibrant community where families could plant roots and small businesses could thrive,” writes Arbel.  The irony is that today the trends of gentrification are putting pressure on these breweries to pack up and move to the next affordable location as real estate prices skyrocket, especially in New York City.  Steve Hindy, co-founder and president of Brooklyn in Williamsburg tells Arbel, “We sowed the seeds of our own demise.”

Read Tali Arbel’s complete article to learn more about the role brewery’s are playing in transforming post-industrial neighborhoods.

Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente

Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón

Architects: Otto Medem de la Torriente
Location: ,
Collaborators: Carlos Bernárdez Agrafojo, Laura Portillo Rodríguez
Area: 351 sqm
Year: 2007
Photographs: Antonio Terrón

Technical Architect: Andrés Garea Noguerol
Construction: Construcciones Paco Paleta S.L.

The project is defined as a home and studio for a photographer in the mountains of Madrid, an environment conductive to quietude, dominated by vegetation and nature.

There were two conditions from which we developed the project:

1. The photography studio as a workplace for the client, where he would spend much of his time.
2. The relationship of the house with the natural surroundings.

The qualities of the plot and the characteristic slate stone of the site where of great help in the design of spaces, volumes and materiality.

We start by separating the housing and studio volumes through a basement constructed with a reinforced concrete wall, built into the ground to bridge the height difference of the sloping plot.

This basement is clad in the same slate which supports the house, making it part of the site. The two housing volumes rise in order to dominate the surroundings from the interior. They are clad in apiary stone that blends with the natural landscape of this area of the mountain.

The housing program is developed on the ground floor: 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, kitchen-dining room, and a large living room from which to contemplate the quiet of the hillside. The studio is located on the first floor, spatially connected with the ground floor and framing the view from its large windows.

The construction of the house is designed with a structure of load bearing brick walls, metallic columns and concrete one-way slabs, and a sloping roof with hidden gutters, that make the edges of the main volume define the boundaries of the home.

The volumetric ensemble allows one to perceive how the dwelling adapts to the steep topography of the site from where it dominates the landscape, sunlight and dialogue with its most immediate surroundings.

A composition in harmony with the stone folds of Torremocha del Jarama.

A simple construction, without much technological and economical fanfare, without having to sacrifice an avant-garde aesthetic.

Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente © Antonio Terrón
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente First Floor Plan
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente Basement Level Plan
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente North Elevation
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente South Elevation
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente East Elevation
Torremocha del Jarama / Otto Medem de la Torriente West Elevation

Ataranzas Municipal Market Restoration Project / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos

Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos

Architects: Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Location: Malaga, Spain
Project Architects: Mª José Aranguren López, José González Gallegos
Year: 2010
Photographs: Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos

Collaborators: Pablo Aranguren López, Arturo Alberquilla Rodríguez, Luis Burriel Bielza, Silvia Díez González, Pablo Fernández Lewicki, Simón Francés Martínez, Mónica Fresno Fernández, Blanca Juanes Juanes, Roberto Ortiz De Landázuri Monagas, José Antonio Rodríguez Casas, Javier Rubio Montero, Marta Sorribes Gil, José Antonio Tallón Iglesias.
Technical Architect: Jacobo Arenal Frías
Building Services: ETINSA SA

The restoration project, now completed, is the result of a national competition organized by the Ministry of Development in 2000.

It is a restoration and recovery operation for the former Ataranzas Central Market, as well as an operation of substitution of existing stalls, as they are unable to meet the necessary conditions required today. This is a unique building in iron structure of the late nineteenth century, with commercial space located at street level, divided into three areas for marketing fruit and vegetables, fish, and meat.

The project has aimed to recover the original design of the old Ataranzas Market by architect Rucoba, enhancing its character and architectural monumentality.

The interventions developed in the project are divided into two: first, into operations affecting the building as such and its representative quality, ie designed regardless of the layout and design of stalls, and second, into operations focused on the description of the design, distribution and allocation of stalls.

In order to recover the original building scheme, we demolished all the later additions, which prevented the perfect interpretation of the building, such as the asbestos cement roofs, flat ceilings, or the central mezzanine added in 1973, in which stood the cafeteria and facilities. Without adding any practical or commercial space, the mezzanine distorted the perspective, height, and beauty of the building. Its demolition allows us to recover the great central space and the visual connection of the major axis of Puerta de las Ataranzas and the large window, a space on a single floor without any architectural barriers, and with the market stalls introduced into the great container.

This recovers the original idea of the Rucoba project, which is considered the most coherent and functional, as well as logic, for the perfect functioning and understanding of the building.

The rehabilitation of the market seeks to fully respect the architectural and spatial design of the existing building, and its critical performance is to design a formal and spatial organization of the stalls that allows the view of the great market space, while providing an overall adequacy to current needs, so as to clarify and enhance the circulation of the user through the indoor-outdoor spatial unit, eliminating architectural barriers. Similarly, in order to devise a space as suitable as possible, we have generated a new centralized system for building facilities on the market streets that allows the cleaning and maintenance of the entire market in ideal conditions of sanitation and hygiene.

Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Courtesy of Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Original state
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Plan
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Elevation
Proyecto de Remodelación del Mercado Municipal de Atarazanas / Aranguren & Gallegos Arquitectos Elevation

Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos

Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán

Architects: Olalquiaga Arquitectos
Location: Madrid, Spain
Architect In Charge: Rafael Olalquiaga Soriano, Pablo Olalquiaga Bescós, Alfonso Olalquiaga Bescós
Design Team: Javier Morales Luchena, Jesús Resino, Luis Cristóbal
Civil Engineer: Luis Casas
Year: 2013
Photographs: Miguel de Guzmán

Click here to view the embedded video.

The housing development in Vallecas is the main urban planning development in Madrid today. It is almost completely organised in a homogenous pattern of closed square blocks of 75 meters a side. The plot for the competition occupies three thirds of such a block.

In the report accompanying the project submitted to the competition we stated:

No to the completely closed block (A)

Yes to an open and fractured block (B) that allows for:

- the search for sunlight through open spaces
- different sized spaces with variable heights
- interior and exterior perspectives that provide diverse,  crossed and changing views
- diagonals that change with the light and allow diverse approaches and quiet spaces

The building has 163 one-bedroom apartments, two commercial spaces and parking space. There are five floors above-ground and two underground floors. The interior part of the plot has been left free of any underground construction in order to plant a great number of trees that will create a pleasant indoor ambiance.

Apartments
Access points
Commercial space

The building is distributed in 4 blocs with a central corridor serving as access to the apartments. Instead of a uniform and monotonous corridor, probably poorly lit and ventilated, we propose, through subtraction and substitution of habitable cells, its widening in some parts as well as the liberating of some habitable modules, in order to achieve greater diversity, the entrance of more natural light and views.

Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos © Miguel de Guzmán
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Basament Floor Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Second Floor Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Third Floor Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Fourth Floor Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos First Floor Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Basament Floor Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Ground Floor Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Roof Floor Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Site Plan
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos East Elevation
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos North Elevation
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Section
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Section
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Detail
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Detail
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Detail
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Detail
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Detail
Social Housing in Valleca´s Eco-boulevard / Olalquiaga Arquitectos Detail

AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn

AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Photo by R. Arlt via via www.aip.de

The Einstein Tower, designed by the German architect , is one of the best-known examples of German expressionist architecture. Designed as an amorphic structure of reinforced concrete, Mendelsohn wanted the tower to represent as well as facilitate the study of  Einstein’s radical theory of relativity – a groundbreaking theorem of motion, light and space.

More on this expressionist monument after the break…

Astrophysicist Erin Finlay Freundlich commissioned Mendelsohn (along with a young Richard Neutra on his team) to design the Einstein Tower as a research facility for the theory of relativity. Between 1917-1920 Mendelsohn made numerous sketches of the facility, attempting to create a dynamic structure which would give form to Einstein’s groundbreaking theories. The resulting plan revealed a centralized observatory tower, banded by rings of windows, raised on top of a wavelike platform that would house the laboratories.

Influenced by the work of expressionist artists of the time, such as the painter Wassily Kandinsky and designer Hermann Obrist, Mendelsohn began to search for new methods of construction that would allow expressional freedom, which is why he eventually settled upon easily sculpted reinforced concrete as his material:

“Every building material, like every substance, has certain conditions governing the demands that can be made on it… steel in combination with concrete, reinforced concrete, is the building material for formal expression, for the new style… the relation between support and load, this apparently eternal law, will also have to alter its image, for things support themselves which formerly had to be supported…Towers mount and grow out of themselves with their own power and spirit and soul” [1]

Building commenced in Potsdam, in 1921. Unfortunately, however, the sculpted concrete structure proved difficult to execute with the technological capabilities of the time. The failure to complete the building according to his original plan prevented him from designing such ambitious projects in the future, and the Einstein Tower remains his best known building.

The research center opened in 1924 and held the most important solar observatory facilities until World War II, when it was severely damaged. In 1999 the building was reopened, in honor of its 75th anniversary, following two years of renovation; today it houses a working solar observatory as well as a visitors’ center.

In the years following its construction, the Einstein Tower, a potent symbol of expressionism, figured centrally in the German architecture debates about whether architecture should prioritize expression or pure functionalism, as represented by the International Style. While it’s clear today, almost 100 years later, that functionalism would dominate Europe’s built landscape, the Einstein Tower remains an interesting and unique counterpoint to the modernist style.

Architects: Erich Mendelsohn
Year: 1921

AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Photo by R. Arlt via via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn by Benjamin Joel Isaacs / flickr.com/photos/74125047@N00/
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn by Yoav Lerman / flickr.com/photos/yoavlerman
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn by Yoav Lerman / flickr.com/photos/yoavlerman
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Copyright Gary Catchen
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Photo by R. Arlt via via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Photo by R. Arlt via via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Photo by R. Arlt via via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Photo by R. Arlt via via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Photo by R. Arlt via via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Photo by R. Arlt via via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn Erich Mendelsohn, Einstein Tower on Front Cover of Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung (1921)
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn via www.aip.de
AD Classics: The Einstein Tower / Erich Mendelsohn via www.aip.de

[1]  Kathleen James: Expressionism, Relativity, and the Einstein Tower

‘Sa(ndy)licornia’: MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson

'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson

The ’Sa(ndy)licornia’ proposal, which was one of the selected entries in the MOMA PS1 Call for Ideas, is a reaction to the fact that in many ways Sandy, effectively, became a brand, and in doing so it provided all sorts of people with various sorts of “meaning”. From this point of view, architect Daniel J Wilson focuses on how disasters can be understood to provide a form of social glue, clear-eyed perspectives about “what really matters”, and the possibility of rebuilding something from scratch, only better. More images and architects’ description after the break.

I would describe my project as mainly a reaction.  But not simply a reaction to Sandy, or a reaction in the way that I think the call for proposals had in mind.  My proposal was in fact a reaction to the “reaction”.

In regard to “meaning”, there are several ways this appeared after Sandy. The people who showed their “support” by adding the sobriquet “Sandy Fundraiser” to their regular events.  The non-profits who, lets admit it, thrive off of events of this nature.  The photographers who descended and spruced up their portfolios – and only for the price of a metro ticket!  The makers of the cringeingly self-congratulatory and totally self-unaware short film “The Rider and the Storm” (which played at Tribeca, of course, and was produced by Olivia Wilde, no less – everyone wins!). The point being that amid all of this loud and declarative hand-wringing many people were getting something out of their peripheral Sandy experience.

This is, admittedly, a somewhat cynical view of what was certainly an outpouring of genuine good will that even Kant would have approved.  However, don’t let the cynicism obscure the larger point – that Sandy wasn’t ALL BAD.  That many people showed generosity that they hadn’t know they were capable of.  Others interacted with neighbors whose names they had never bothered to know.  Still others learned painful but valuable lessons about the transience of life and the ultimately inconsequential nature of material goods.

Honestly, imagine how boring and bland a world without disaster would rapidly become. So the point of “Sa(ndy)licornia” was to embrace the fact that we live in a disaster filled world; and rather than try and embark on the impossible task of eliminating the disasters, to take a utilitarian view and simply figure out how we can make the best use of our disasters.

The specific idea outlined in the proposal is a simple and symbolic one, but the larger idea is complex and deserves serious consideration.

'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson Courtesy of Daniel J Wilson
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson concept sketch 01
'Sa(ndy)licornia': MOMA PS1 Rockaway Call for Ideas Winning Proposal / Daniel J Wilson concept sketch 02

The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel

The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe

Architects: Mangor & Nagel
Location: , Denmark
Architect In Charge: Mangor & Nagel A/S
Area: 2,000 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Tom Jersøe

Building Project: Indoor public swimming bath in Stevns, Denmark
Client: Stevns Municipality
Building Contractor: MT Højgaard A/S

”The Cliff” is an indoor public swimming bath in the Danish region Stevns. The architecture of the building is inspired by the cliffs of Stevns, Northern Europe’s most important geological locality. It is based on the transition between the landscape and the village, and the building rises steadily and proudly from the landscape in the east towards the buildings in the west. At the top end of the sloped roof, the white wall abruptly finishes the sculpture, and the furrowed front of the building and the window openings together illustrate how the facade is inspired by the chalk layers of the natural cliffs. A cut in the facade opens up the building to the landscape and allows the light to flood into it, while the white plaster facade fits the local white washed buildings.

The plan of the building develops from a perpendicular L-shape, where each angle forms two functional cores. The Northern core consists of the changing facilities, swimming pool, the wellness area and the communal room near the foyer. The Western core is designed for staff functions and is situated near the entrance. Together these cores form an open angle that embraces the view and creates room for the pools in between. The hot pool is sheltered by the extension of the area with the changing facilities, to make it easy to shield the pool when needed, in order to avoid noise, bustle and views from the other pools. Between the two cores, the foyer is formed as a slot through the tall rear of the building. The sloping roof is constructed to meet the need for various ceiling heights in the different parts of the building, and the rooms are designed to make the best possible use of the square meters available.

The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel © Tom Jersøe
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel Ground Floor Plan
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel Site Plan
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel Section
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel West Facade
The Cliff / Mangor & Nagel South Facade

Pablo Picasso's stepdaughter claims theft of over 400 of his artworks

Over 400 artworks by Pablo Picasso stolen from the home of his stepdaughter, she has stated, in what appears to be one of the most audacious art thefts of recent times.

    

Eduardo Paolozzi, at Pallant House

This retrospective is hard-going at times, but it also confirms Eduardo Paolozzi was far more than just the pioneer of pop art, says Alastair Smart.

    

Arts, Briefly: Comedy Central Plans a Cosby TV Special

Bill Cosby plans to return to television this fall with a stand-up comedy concert titled “Far From Finished,” his first special in 30 years.

    

Bridge: United States Team Trials Continue in Orlando

The women’s and senior international team trials are continuing in Orlando, Fla.

    

Music Review: Jonathan Biss Plays Beethoven at Caramoor

The pianist Jonathan Biss performed four Beethoven sonatas outdoors at the Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts.

    

Television Review: Kevin Pearce Is the Subject of Lucy Walker’s ‘Crash Reel’

The snowboarder Kevin Pearce, whose career was derailed by a devastating accident while training for the Olympics, is at the center of a new documentary by Lucy Walker.

    

Music Review: Latin Alternative Music Conference in New York

Women from Mexico reigned at the 14th annual Latin Alternative Music Conference.

    

Critic’s Notebook: Game of War: Fire Age Translates Players’ Chat

In Game of War: Fire Age, players’ chat is translated into many languages, in theory at least, making it a global mobile game.

    

Music Review: New York Philharmonic and Mariah Carey Team Up

Mariah Carey joined the New York Philharmonic for a charity concert on the Great Lawn in Central Park.

    

Discredited Wartime Hero’s Backers Rebut Charges

Supporters of Giovanni Palatucci, a wartime Italian previously praised for saving thousands of Jews, rebutted charges by researchers who described him as a Nazi collaborator.

    

Music Review: Bang on a Can All-Stars at Rite of Summer Festival

The Bang on a Can All-Stars played works by several composers at the Rite of Summer Music Festival on Governors Island.

    

Books of The Times: Charlie Huston’s ‘Skinner,’ a Thriller With a Troubled Hero

A so-called asset protector with a troubled past is the protagonist in Charlie Huston’s thriller “Skinner.”

    

Week in Review: July 14, 2013

Welcome to Week in Review, our Sunday round-up of the last 7 days of activity here at Contemporary Art Daily. Please subscribe to our RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, follow us on Tumblr, and become a fan on Facebook.

You can also visit our Office Notebook for a list of all the summer group shows we’ve published so far this season.

This week’s featured exhibitions:

Carsten Höller at Air de Paris

Giorgio Ciam at A Palazzo

John Knight at Galerie NEU and MD 72

John Knight at Portikus

Ben Schumacher and Carlos Reyes at Tomorrow

“The Future is Stupid” at The Green Gallery

Wolfgang Breuer at Halle für Kunst Lüneburg

Emily Sundblad at Algus Greenspon

Margaret Lee and Emily Sundblad at Off Vendome

“Prodigal in Blue” at Laura Bartlett

“Abstrakt” at Sammlung Haubrok

“Notes on Neo-Camp” at Studio Voltaire

“Confronti” at GAMeC

“Better Homes” at Sculpture Center

Have an excellent week.

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

“Better Homes” at Sculpture Center

Artists: Jonathas de Andrade, Neïl Beloufa, Keith Edmier, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Robert Gober, Tamar Guimarães, Anthea Hamilton, E’wao Kagoshima, Yuki Kimura, KwieKulik, Paulina Olowska, Kirsten Pieroth, Josephine Pryde, Carissa Rodriguez, Martha Rosler, Güneş Terkol

Venue: Sculpture Center, New York

Exhibition Title: Better Homes

Date: April 22 – July 22, 2013

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Video: 

Tamara Guimarães, Canoas, 2010.

 

Neïl Beloufa, Real Estate, 2012.

 

Images:

"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
Josephine Pryde
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
LaToya Ruby Frazier
Neïl Beloufa
Güneş Terkol
KwieKulik
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
Güneş Terkol
Keith Edmier
Kirsten Pieroth
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
KwieKulik, Activities with Dobromierz, 1972-1974, digitized 2008. Courtesy Raster Gallery, Warsaw
Yuki Kimura
Anthea Hamilton
Keith Edmier
"Better Homes" at Sculpture Center
Neïl Beloufa

Images courtesy of Sculpture Center, New York. Photos by Jason Mandella.

Press Release:

“You will express yourself in your house, whether you want to or not….”
- Elsie de Wolfe, The House in Good Taste, 1913.

SculptureCenter is pleased to announce the group exhibition Better Homes. Better Homes brings together a group of artists who examine the construction of the interior through design and homemaking from critical perspectives. As the notion of home shifted in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and interior space was being redefined and redecorated according to the aspirations of modernity, the interior became integral to the construction of the subject. Interiors were an extension of identity, representing gender, fashion, and class, and re-establishing what constituted the private and the public. Now, in the 21st century, interior design has been professionalized and packaged for the mass market. With the proliferation of department stores and publications instructing consumers on how to make the best dinners, living rooms, and lifestyles, how has the notion of domestic space, and all it encapsulates, been redefined in contemporary culture? What are the impacts of shifting ideas of family, identity, politics and consumerism in the private realm? Touching on the history of the interior to its present iterations, the artists in the exhibition examine displays of domesticity, as constructed through spaces and things.

Artworks in the exhibition include a photographic installation by Yuki Kimura (b.1971, Japan), comprising freestanding panel structures with found black and white prints of interiors. The spaces are void of people, becoming portraits of intimate spaces and lifestyles that are relegated into the past. The installation becomes both a mirror and fragment of a certain notion of domesticity. Tamar Guimarães’s (b.1967, Brazil) film Canoas depicts a home constructed by Oscar Niemeyer in the 1950s outside of Rio de Janeiro for the purpose of entertainment and pleasure. Through a narrative that primarily focuses on the servants that care for the home, Guimarães highlights the conflicted relationship between modernist architecture in Brazil and class structures. Kirsten Pieroth (b. 1970, Germany) examines notions of legacy and heritage using objects that symbolize domesticity and familial bonds. Her objects reference family heirlooms, such as Fabergé eggs and crystal glassware, however her interpretations use simple materials that alter attributes of value.

Better Homes is curated by Ruba Katrib, SculptureCenter Curator. The exhibition is accompanied by a full color publication with a text by Katrib and a contribution by poet Ariana Reines.

Link: “Better Homes” at Sculpture Center 

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

“Confronti” at GAMeC

Artist: Enrico Castellani, Dan Colen, Dadamaino, and Piotr Uklański

Venue: GAMeC, Bergamo

Exhibition Title: Confronti

Date: May 18 – July 21, 2013

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC
Confronti at GAMeC

Images courtesy of GAMeC. Photos by Roberto Marossi.

Press Release:

From 18 May to 21 July 2013 GAMeC – Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Bergamo is proud to host Confronti, a project that – as the title suggests – arose with the intent of comparing the artistic paths of four leading figures in contemporary art: Enrico Castellani, Dan Colen, Dadamaino and Piotr Uklański.

Through an overview of about forty works, the exhibition traces and updates the research into abstract, kinetic and programmatic art that commenced in the late Fifties and matured in the Sixties, movements that have now been re-examined and reinterpreted. The exhibition extends from Dadamaino, who actively contributed to the artistic avant-garde movements with her geometric-perceptual research, developed in the composition of a visual alphabet of signs, to Enrico Castellani, whose artistic and theoretical role as the founder of the journal Azimuth together with Manzoni, is deemed to be fundamental in the history of twentieth-century abstract art because of his ability to reduce the pictorial tradition to an impersonal and monochromatic zero level while using the same expressive media: canvas, paintbrush, colour.

The works of the two Italian artists, born in 1930, will be juxtaposed with those of Piotr Uklański (b. 1968), Polish by birth but a New Yorker by choice, and the American Dan Colen (b. 1979). Uklański investigates the meaning of painting and the pictorial gesture; in his works the lesson of abstraction is united with the imaginary and the language of performing art and popular culture.

Colen embraces elements of the underground culture and, in particular, the punk movement of the Seventies: steel studs create movement on monochromatic canvases, which bridge object and painting, history and culture.

Link: “Confronti” at GAMeC

 

 

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Cory Monteith, Star of Hit Show ‘Glee,’ Found Dead

Cory Monteith, the young actor who shot to fame in the hit TV series “Glee,” was found dead in a hotel room in Vancouver around noon on Saturday, police said. He was 31.

    

Summer of Utopia: March My Darlings

Because it’s summer and we are either dreaming of or living in a haze of heat, sun and (hopefully) minimal clothing, this week we bring you an article from the DS week-long series “Summer of Utopia” which was featured in July of 2010. The post was written by Catherine Wagley as a part of her weekly column L.A. Expanded. The subjects of Ms. Wagley’s entry are photographer and videographer Ryan McGinley and the Levi’s summer 2009 ad campaign. This summer, Ryan McGinley’s own utopic video, Varúð, is being displayed just before midnight in the middle of Times Square, synchronized on 15 of the square’s largest screens. The public art installation was put on by Art Production Fund (the team also behind the most recent corralling of the NY art scene for the Jay-Z “Picasso Baby” music video).

L.A. Expanded: Notes from the West Coast
A weekly column by Catherine Wagley

M. Blash. Reel image from Go Forth commercial for Levi's, 2009.

In the spot filmmaker M. Blash created for Levi’s Jeans in 2009, Walt Whitman’s voice is like the Pied Piper’s pipe. “Come my tan-faced children, Follow well in order, get your weapons ready,” recites Whitman, played by an actor (an earlier Levi’s spot purportedly featured an actual recording of the poet). As he says this, the faces of slim, young, beautiful people turn or lean forward like they’ve been summoned; one woman with windswept blond hair and rosy cheeks looks as though she’s bracing herself for a fight. He continues:

Have you your pistols? have you your sharp-edged axes?
Pioneers! O pioneers!

For we cannot tarry here,
We must march my darlings, we must bear the brunt of danger.

The young people begin to move, running through fields, scaling rocks and weaving through forests. Dusk approaches, and the “youthful sinewy races” converge, their silhouettes gliding across the screen in front of a still-blue sky. “So impatient, full of action, full of manly pride and friendship,” says Whitman. “Plain I see you Western youths, see you tramping with the foremost.” There are fire works and shirtless dancing as it darkens, and the young bodies come together like the members of a euphoric hippie commune. “Have the elder races halted?” Whitman asks. “Do they droop and end their lesson, wearied over there beyond the seas? All the past we leave behind.”

Ryan McGinley, known for his wispily androgynous photographs of young creatives, shot the accompanying Levi’s print campaign. I see one particular image, a black and white photograph of two twenty-something boys embracing a horse, each time I walk to the bakery in my largely Salvadoran neighborhood. It hangs on the inside wall of a mini bus shelter and, often, aging men and women who speak to each other only in Spanish sit in front of it.  Other times, my favorite panhandler, a tall, disheveled man who tells me baked goods are bad for me in hopes that I will give my money to him instead, lurks around McGinley’s sign. I don’t know what marketing strategy or loophole led this image  to this particular street, but the eerie, utopic youth culture that McGinley presents hangs right in the midst of the very people it excludes.

Ryan McGinley. Tracy (Dripping), 2009; photograph.

Anything utopic needs exclusivity, since creating an ideal community means shedding what doesn’t fit the ideal. Utopic ideals also need to be slippery; they can be imagined and represented but never attained, and that’s what makes them attractive.

Ryan McGinley understands utopia better than most. He’s a 21st Century artist who still has muses, and he’s mused these muses into scenarios and settings in which they withdraw from the world and exclusively invest in each other. In 2002, when he became the youngest artist to have a museum show at the Whitney, his photographs purportedly depicted an edgy, brash youth underground in New York but they did so in a way that was so romanticized and ephemeral that they felt like they’d flown in from an alternate universe. His images of Dash Snow the tagger-turned-art-star are especially compelling. Dash lived hard, fast and grittily, which made him muse-worthy but it’s not necessarily the hardness and grit that McGinley chose to present. “I love the idea of graffiti,” he told Ana Finel Honigman in 2003. “But I am not really excited by its esthetics. . . . I love the idea of a kid writing his name hundreds of thousands of times, over and over and over because he feels he needs to.” The Dash that McGinley presented over and over again had an immense, unbridled need for community. He existed above the surface of himself, drawing people to him with his hovering openness. “So impatient, full of action, full of manly pride and friendship.”

Ryan McGinley. Photograph of Dash Snow, n.d.

When journalist Ariel Levy shadowed McGinley and Dash Snow in 2007, she described the intimacy of their clique: “There is a physicality between these guys, in their photos and in life, that you usually only see among little kids.” Like most utopic fantasies McGinley creates, including those for Levi’s, adult inhibitions totally dissipate in his portrayals of Dash. All that matters is to constantly stay in motion and to move toward a collective future, bringing along the people who are young and beautiful. It’s never clear where that future is or what it represents.

“Pioneers! O pioneers!” wrote Walt Whitman in 1855. “Fresh and strong the world we seize.”

“Heroin, oh heroin, oh heroin,”  wrote McGinley for Vice Magazine in 2009, the year Dash died. “Taken the lives of so many great artists. Taken so many of my friends’ lives.” McGinley continued, remembering Dash’s “unconscious moving hand. He would be sitting there smoking cigarettes, writing his tag in the air.” It’s this weird collision of hopefulness, tragedy, beauty and listlessness that I think of now when I walk past the bus stop and see the two boys with their horse in the Levi’s “Go Forth!” ad that hangs where it doesn’t belong.